and now....wax moths =(

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by bwwertz, Nov 26, 2011.

  1. bwwertz

    bwwertz New Member

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    Was storing two deep supers in my laundry room in the house. Wrapped and secured tightly with garbage bags. Found today that BOTH deeps and frames (which were almost entirely capped honey) are infested with wax moths. The bottom deep wasn't TOO bad. I haven't looked all through the top one, but at least 10 moths flew out at me when I peeled back the plastic after finding the hole they had created. What should I do with ALL this honey?
    My Dad suggested we extract it and feed it to our hives as the winter feed.
    I'm wondering if I shouldn't just set the two deeps on a table near the hive and let both hives rob it on the warmer days. The four frames that had NO evidence of any "cocoons" or wax moth "mess" we put into the freezer.
    Again - looking for help/guidance as to what to do with all this honey that's now been infested with wax moths. Cocoons that I could see and all moths are now dead.
    Could/Should I freeze EVERYTHING and let them clean it up on their own after it's frozen for a while? Really not sure what to do and two beeks I tried calling haven't called me back yet. =(
    HELP ME, PLEASE!
    Thank you!
     
  2. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    I would freeze everything, even if you were going to feed it back, that way it will kill all of the eggs and tiny larva you can not see/find. Leave it in the freezer for two to three days and then just bring out a frame or two at a time to feed back to your hives. I like to place them at least 100 feet or better away from the hives to help avoid a robbing frenzy. You could extract and feed back to them but that is just more work for you, plus you will still set the wet frames out for them to clean up anyway.
     

  3. rast

    rast New Member

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    Agree with G3, only I set the whole box(s) out about 100 yards.
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I don't agree. I am too lazy to agree with all that work.

    Freeze them for a few days, let thaw completely, then set one on each hive, on the bottom. The bees will move it up. Then remove the empties in the spring.
     
  5. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    That would depend on how many hives he wants to feed and how many boxes he has to divy up the honey frames. Some folks don't have the extra equipment laying around that we may have. Plus I an too lazy to lift up the hives to slide in a extra box.
     
  6. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    ""and let both hives rob it on the warmer days.""

    I'm thinking he has two deeps of honey and two hives of bees.
     
  7. rast

    rast New Member

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    You lost me, seems like less work to freeze thaw, put back in a box and set out. Bees will still put where they want it.
     
  8. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Then you still have to do something for them in storage or the moths will move back in. There will be new eggs in them by the time they are cleaned.
     
  9. bwwertz

    bwwertz New Member

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    Thank you SOOOOOO much for all the advice/guidance/input! My Dad and I talked and we think we're going to take the advice to attempt to freeze them for at least three days, then thaw, then place on bottom board with existing deep above that (did I understand that correctly?) (Also, why would we place them on the bottom of existing deep as opposed to on the top? Don't they move up in the hive during the winter?).
    If I'm understanding correctly, this will help solve the clean up problem as well as the seeming lack of food problem in my hive as well.
    Thank you all again so very much! Please keep the advice/thoughts/ideas coming!
    (and I'm a "she") :D
     
  10. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    They store from top to bottom. If you put it on top, they won't move it. If you put it on bottom, they will move the clean honey to the top and discard the debris.
     
  11. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    If you do decide to put them on the top be sure they are thawed out and warmed up to at least outside temps., putting the frozen honey on the top of a hive will let all of the cold funnel down through the nest and could chill them.