another bee sting incident

Discussion in 'Bee News' started by riverrat, Jul 27, 2013.

  1. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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  3. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Africanized bees almost certainly - Pantego, TX

    http://www.star-telegram.com/2013/07/26/5032725/thousands-of-bees-attack-couple.html
    These bees killed 2 miniature horses. Photos in the article show very impressive comb structure, bees have been there for years probably, maybe a new queen and hotter bees.

    Less than 5 miles from this house I looked at a bee tree a month ago, neighbor of the tree's owner called me. Even if I would remove the bees for free, she would not sign a waiver of liability, wanted her carpenter ant infested tree to last a couple of more years..

    So they are still there, as of when I left. Fortunately they are very mild tempered bees. She probably sprayed them though.
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    well I guess we will eventually get some answer on origin. from the pictures.... the straight bottom edge of the comb would lead me to believe africanized bees but the size of the nest would suggest to me european.
     
  5. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Looks like a multi-year European with a new queen who mated African. Tests results will tell.
     
  6. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    I don't know much about AHB, but have read they will produce more honey than the european bees? With there habit of excessive swarming i would think that is incorrect? Jack
     
  7. Lburou

    Lburou Member

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    tec :)

    What precautionary actions would you recommend to a beekeeper doing a cut out or catching a swarm in our neck of the woods? I got into a small bunch of bees this Spring that was all brood (no honey) and defended their hive with such ferocity that I killed them on the spot. They were 30 feet from the golf cart path on the golf course, so it was important to solve the equation ASAP. Are there any tricks to spotting an Africanized bunch of bees? I've read that excessive bearding, running to the bottom or ends of the frames during inspections, boiling out of the hive when the top is removed are all consistent with Africanized bees. Anything else?
     
  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a Jack snip..
    With there habit of excessive swarming i would think that is incorrect?

    tecumseh..
    from what I understand from the state bee inspector here (left to their own natural tendencies) a european bee will produce an approximate excess of about 180 pounds of honey and then swarm and an africanized bee will produce an approximate excess of about 80 pounds and then swarm. so based on that I think your thinking is quite correct.

    and to lburou...
    at one time of course here at the Texas A&M Bee lab we had a young lady who you could send samples to and have some lab results to indicate origin. sadly that position was terminated due to lack of funding several years back. now I suspect everyone who remove bees of unknown origin should always be on the alert and simply do as you did in your comment. that is... if the hive seems excessively defensive then simply be prepared to eliminate such bees. I essentially do the same thing in manage hives although in that context it is really more about pinching the head of the old queen and inserting a queen of know origin <in managed hives (most especially here in Texas) I cannot image any reason why someone should tolerate nasty bees.

    hungry bees* will almost always be very defensive unless of course they are totally starved in which case they are so meek and mild they will not (or more than likely cannot) fly. runny bees may NOT be such a good indication of africanization since some europeans will do this also and this can be somewhat encouraged by the excessive use of smoke. the same thing goes for boiling out the front entry and I at least would think that this and runny bees could be some what to highly correlated.

    *I sometimes see folks talk about an essential minimum of 20# of honey for bees not to feel somewhat alarmed about their own pantry so anything less that this pretty much qualifies in my own book as hungry bees.