Another first for me; A lizard entering my hive

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by bamabww, Apr 19, 2012.

  1. bamabww

    bamabww New Member

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    This guy climbed up on my bottom board, with the bees landing and crawling all around him, and ran into the hive. I stood there and watched for 15 minutes expecting the girls to run him out pronto but it never happened. I went back to the house and suited up and looked into the honey super and never saw him. I did not go into the two deep brood chambers. He may have left / got run out or died from bee stings, hopefully, while I was gone to get my bee suit, I'm not for sure.

    He was about 5 inches long and maybe as big around as my little finger. here's some info I found on him: Five-lined Skinks are diurnal, so they are active during the day. They like to crawl out on rocks or logs to bask (soak up heat from the sun) during the day.

    They are also always looking for a meal. Five-lined Skinks eat mostly insects, including: crickets, grasshoppers, beetles, and caterpillars. They also eat spiders, earthworms, snails, slugs, isopods, other lizards, and small mice.

    Five-lined Skinks will often climb dead trees where there are a lot of insects.

    Predators of these lizards include Raccoons, Red Foxes, Virginia Opossums, snakes, and hawks.

    Anyone ever seen this before?

    Here's one like the one I saw enter my hive:

    Efasciatus3.jpg 5 lined skink.jpg
     
  2. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    On many occasions I've had lizards (a different species than yours, Agama stelio) take up home inside of hives. I don't know just what they do there but I assume they feast on unsuspecting bees. A few times I've had lizards that climb up onto the roof of a hive, sit on the corner and snap up any bees that fly around the roof instead of going directly into the hive. I guess that teaches a lesson to those bees that aren't working as diligently as they should be. :lol:
     

  3. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    Since they're cold blooded, maybe they like the heat generated in the hive.
     
  4. RE Jones

    RE Jones New Member

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    I have one that stays on the board that covers the screened bottom on my TBH. He is under the screen, so he can not get to the bees unless they go down there.

    I hope he is keeping the SHB population down, as I find them on this board evry now and then.

    Robert
     
  5. jmblakeney

    jmblakeney New Member

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    A lil off topic.... I have always called them blue tailed lizards. If you every get the chance to catch it try not to grab him by the tail. If you do it will come off and Mr. Lizard will run away and hide while his tail is laying there twitching around. He will grow a new one so he can get away from the next predator that comes along trying to catch him:grin:.

    James
     
  6. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

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    I had that happen to a couple of my hives and the hives absconded. I suspect that since it was doing it in the summer that it wasn't due to the heat but the food source... easy food and I doubt the bees could sting through their scales.

    PS - I've always called them blue tailed skinks.
     
  7. Tia

    Tia New Member

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    I once had a green lizard take up residence in one of my hives. He would sit at the front with the guard bees and would retreat inside whenever I would show up. The bees never bothered him although I'm sure he bothered them when he felt like a snack!
     
  8. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    Thanks for posting this info Wayne.
    Now I have something else to worry about.:lol:
     
  9. jim314

    jim314 New Member

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    Very interesting. I saw them all the time when I lived in the Ozark foothills in Arkansas, but don't remember seeing any since living in Texas. I'm surprised if they are eating bees inside the hive that they are not attacked. James is right, I broke a few off as a kid :)