antibiotics given to bees before there is a problem can cause a problem

Discussion in 'Bee News' started by Americasbeekeeper, Sep 28, 2012.

  1. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    Symbionts as Major Modulators of Insect Health: Lactic Acid Bacteria and Honeybees
    Honeybees possess an abundant, diverse and ancient LAB microbiota in their honey crop with beneficial effects for bee health, defending them against microbial threats. Beekeeping management practices can negatively impact this microbiota. The crop microbiota of A. mellifera is composed of 13 bacterial species within the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium [16], [17], [18] and it plays a key role in the production of honey [16] and bee-bread [19], long term stored food for both adult honeybees and larvae. We have demonstrated by both in vitro and in vivo studies that the LAB microbiota in A. mellifera inhibit one important honeybee pathogen, the bacterial brood pathogen Paenibacillus larvae that is the cause of the brood disease American foulbrood (AFB)

    To dumb it down – antibiotics given to bees before there is a problem can cause a problem!

    http://www.plosone.org/article/info...irect)|utmcmd=(none)&__utmv=-&__utmk=60534318
     
  2. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Yeah, sort of the mindset of 'let's just kill everything off, that way we'll be sure to get the bad stuff!" So short sighted, and then later on we ALL pay the price.
     

  3. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Thanks Gary your posting of these studies and finding are insightful to understanding the causes and effects that have been plaguing the bees. Your diligent saves me having to search for these studies. In Canada now the apiary branches recommend only treating for brood diseases if it is found or if your bees may have been exposed to it.
    Thanks again apisbees
     
  4. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    I think it should be noted that besides the synthetic creations llike coumaphos and flluvalinate etc. there are other naturally occurring potions that can be anti biotic or anti microbial that can disrupt the normal and often essential background culture compatible to the bee. Dont make the assumption that "natural" is automatically good or that man made is essentially evil. Unforseen consequences bite!
     
  5. Daniel Y

    Daniel Y New Member

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    I don't know bees nearly as well as I know fish, specifically aquariums. This topic brings to mind a situation in aquarium that I am very familiar with. It is common for a person with little experience to have an aquarium with cloudy water and fish that will not stay alive. That is because they do not have an understanding of the overall biology of an aquarium. There is actually a complete system that must form in an aquarium for it to be not only clear and remain that way. but for it to be an environment that fish remain healthy or even alive. To most people the answer to cloudy water is to change it. scrub out the aquarium even. and this is exactly the worst thing you can do. At most do nothing more than a partial water change and even then learn when enough water being changed is enough. most of the water needs to be left in the aquarium to "age". aging means that a colony of bacteria is able to grow that will actually keep the water clean. there are bacteria that eat waste. these bacteria as well as the fish produce ammonia. there are then bacteria that eats ammonia that then give off nitrites. nitrites will still kill fish just not as quickly as ammonia. there are then bacteria that eat nitrites and they give off nitrates. and nitrates make great fertilizer and are nearly harmless to fish. so algae grow in the aquarium at any given opportunity. algae is a good way to determine when to do partial water changes. adding live plants to the aquarium is another way to deal with nitrates.

    In addition the fish produce a slime that actually dissolves in the water and conditions it. each type of fish actually has a slightly different condition to the water that is best for them. you do not want to remove this conditioned water to often.

    The best way to manage a healthy aquarium is to understand this process. I tend to keep 55 gallon or larger aquariums and seldom even do partial water changes more than once every 3 months. 6 months is far more common. smaller aquariums are more unstable and require more frequent care.

    Now suppose that a similar biological condition is being made in a beehive. what does or meddling really do. as this topic indicates are we making our bees sick trying to help them? Just as it is very easy to do in an aquarium. what does this mean for the practice of feeding sugar water, dusting with sugar. much less adding other treatments to the hive. are we blowing the chemical and biological balance of the hive away?

    what is a healthy chemical and biological balance of a beehive anyway?

    A healthy aquarium will smell like freshly turned earth. what should a healthy beehive smell like. a healthy aquarium will grow algae. what will be the signs of a healthy beehive? Do we even know. has anyone left a colony alone long enough to not be screwing it up? And then observed it long enough to notice what might grow in it or what it might smell like? What other indications do we never see because we are always keeping the hive in a state of illness.

    It is very much this sort of issue that causes me to think that beekeepers are actually the cause of how sick bees are today. Not a claim but a very strong suspicion.