Any harm putting new foundation in frames early?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Bees In Miami, Nov 24, 2012.

  1. Bees In Miami

    Bees In Miami New Member

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    First, I apologize, this has probably been asked a million times, but however I worded my search, I did not get answers.

    I have been on a roll today, painting supers, making frames, etc....I have put foundation in 10 frames...Is there any harm continuing with the other frames? New, wax foundation....better to just store till needed? Again, I was on a roll, and was going to do the other 20 frames...I have a nice stand for them in my workshop, so they don't get tossed around...but will the wax dry out, etc???

    Also, if any FL beeks read this, am I crazy thinking I can add a super this time of year? I have a combined hive that's looking pretty full, and was thinking of adding a super. Though we don't freeze like our poor friends up North, it is definately more chilly now. I just don't want to force a swarm... but am I nuts to add a super now? Not much here about FL beeks, vs Northern...I am sure there are differences, but I don't know where to draw the line. I have kind of allowed myself to dismiss the Northern freeze problems, but I know we will have at least a couple nights below freezing, here, too, and don't want to over-stress the bees. Florida feedback please? THANKS!!!!

    TIA all! Bee well!!
     
  2. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Here is a post from a "poor friends up North" if their is a flow happening and the bees are active enough to be bringing in honey and pollen If they need the space for brood laying or to store nectar the bees will draw it out. If they don"t need the space they will ignore it.
     

  3. Bees In Miami

    Bees In Miami New Member

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    Thanks for the reply from the 'frozen ones'....lol...I WAS one of you for too many years...Boston Area! I was most concerned with creating extra space they can't heat. Thanks for the reply!
     
  4. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Your welcome.
    I always emphasize listen to the bees they will tell you in advance their needs if you observe them. When you are going throw your hive look at the number of frames that have brood. Over the next 21 days it will all hatch and every full frame of brood when hatched will produce 2 frames of bees. but look even closer all the brood that is capped will emerge during the next 9 days all the larva will be capped during the next 9 days and emerge during the following 9 days and eggs the following 3 days. Now back to your hive the question is will your hive be expanding in size and need the extra room to house the new emerging bees or will the hive be maintaining its numbers (small patch of brood on 2 or 3 frames in the middle of the cluster.
    The needs of different hives can be greatly different even if they are in the same yard never mind 20 miles down the road.
    When your inspecting your hives after a couple of years of experience, or from picking up on what fellow beekeepers are posting on this forum. You should be going in with an expectation of how the colony should be progressing, if it is not where you feel it should be investigate further. Look for diseases, mites, signs of predators, nector and pollen stores and flows, weather, all things that can effect a colonies build up. If non of these seem an issue look at the queen, brood quantity, quality, and egg laying pattern. React to fix these problems sooner rather than waiting till later when the hive has deteriorated to a critical state.
     
  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    When adding a super, it doesn't absolutely have to go on top. In your case, I would set the super on the bottom. Then it would be there if they want or need it, but would not affect the temperature on a cooler night.

    I would not install foundatiom more than about 30 days before using. It can gather dust, warp, melt, or be invaded by pests.
     
  6. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    One thing to consider is to not give them more real estate than they can guard/protect. That is an invitation to critters (moths/SHB/etc.).
     
  7. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    I use wired wax foundation. I prefer to give the bees freshly installed foundation. The bees seem to accept it better than wax foundation with a 'bloom' on it.

    I am at a slight advantage since I don't have to cross wire UK foundation.