Any need to treat the ground for Wax Moths?

Discussion in 'Pests and Diseases' started by bamabww, Sep 23, 2013.

  1. bamabww

    bamabww Active Member

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    I'm moving a hive now slowly but surely to the stand where I lost an entire colony due to wax moths. I plan on using the same stand for this hive as the doomed colony's hive sat on. Should I treat the ground chemically around the stand before making it a permanent location for the new hive?
     
  2. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    If you would treat the ground, I don't think it would help prevent any future attacks of wax moths. The female moth sneaks into the hive and lays her eggs there. The larvae complete all their development inside the hive. They don't enter the hive from the ground in the immediate vicinity of the hive. If larvae are removed from the hive before they have completed eating enough, they probably never complete their development. But I would not dump full sized larvae or cocoons outside the hive---these could complete their development into adults and serve as a source of infestation.
    ‚ÄčIf you have BT, spraying it on the combs is a much better alternative.
     

  3. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    what ef said wayne, if this will help, google "life cycle of the wax moth", lots of info and this will give you information on both the greater and lesser wax moth. treating the ground will not help you. the best defense for an active hive against wax moths is a strong, healthy, queen right colony, and debris free, (bottom board or sbb) and that your bees can cover or patrol all frames in the hive, including any supers. and also what ef said about not disposing of any larvae, cocoons etc outside the hive. i'd squish the little buggers or feed 'em to some fish.....or maybe the birds.....:grin:
     
  4. The Bee Guy

    The Bee Guy New Member

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    Wax Moths

    One good way to deter the wax moths is to keep a strong colony.
    This is prime weather for the wax moth infestation.
    These cool nights have the bees forming a loose cluster meaning no guard bees at the entrances.
    Wax Moths can fly at colder temperatures than honey bees.
    Usually if you lose a colony to wax moths you had another problem, a weak colony.
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2013
  5. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Wayne,not trying to change your format,but thought this would be a good time to ask. I think i read that there are different kinds of BT, but only one is safe to use on bees? Jack
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a snip....
    Usually if you lose a colony to wax moths you had another problem, a weak colony.

    tecumseh.....
    decades ago before the introduction of varroa it was quite common to hear people say that their hive was killed by wax moth. the truthfulness or the lack of logic of this statement then or now actually makes me cringe just a bit. to be perfectly honest 'the bee guy' has it almost right and would have been dead on if he had of exchanged always for usually in his sentence.

    ef has the drill down properly although at this time of year rather than bt keeping the internal dimension of the hive consistent with the adult population is about the best protection you can hope for in regards to wax moth
     
  7. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    As obvious as the truth of Tec's statement is, I think I failed in observing it, and most probably, that was the cause of my loss of at least two hives from wax moths---the population of the colonies simply wasn't large enough to handle and protect all the frames I left with them after extracting their honey. I had returned extracted frames for cleaning out and left them on the hive, intending that the bees would protect them from wax moths.:doh:
    I guess, what I really did was introduce a "Trojan horse" into the hives---they just weren't up to the job I gave them. :frustrated:
     
  8. bamabww

    bamabww Active Member

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    Exactly what I did as well. I'll know better next time thanks to all of you.