Any wood sugar-water feeder plans

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by TheWoodsman, Oct 8, 2010.

  1. TheWoodsman

    TheWoodsman New Member

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    I have some scrap wood, does anyone have plans for making a wood sugar water feeder? Thanks
     
  2. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    Im going to comment outside of my knowlege. If I understand right you are looking at doing top bar hives. I have not seen (but doesnt mean ther isnt one out there ) a top wood feeder for a top bar. I am not sure about feeding a top bar hive. I am not sure how you would keep from getting sugar water in the honey you harvest. Someone chime in here and educate me on this. I have never thought of feeding a top bar hive how do you do it and keep the sugar water seperate.
     

  3. TheWoodsman

    TheWoodsman New Member

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    I wanted to put the feeder outside the hive next to a birdbath so that in the early stages if the flowers arent there yet they can go grab the sugar-water. I saw some that are a jar with two peices of wood leaving a gap i guess to frain it from, but would like some plans to better make this. Thanks
     
  4. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    i think what you are looking for is called a board man feeder I would put the feeder farther away from the hive thn the bird bath or you might start a robbing frenzy on your hive. When you open feed like you are planning to do be careful you also may be feeding the neighborhood bees that dont belong to you.
     
  5. TheWoodsman

    TheWoodsman New Member

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    Oh, thanks being new that didn't even cross my mind. How far shuold i put the bird bath and board man feeder from my hive. Will other bees join my hive or vice versa? thanks
     
  6. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    if it is to close it may start a robing frenzy on your hive which could destory the hive I would put it out at least 100 foot away i ddont pursonally open feed guys that do can shed some light on this
     
  7. TheWoodsman

    TheWoodsman New Member

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    ok, so put the sugar water 100 feet away even for like... i'm talking if i just got the bees, put them in the hive...brand new, no combs yet. Agian i am just clarifiyng becuase i really don't know and am far from that time yet, but i'm just checking? Once they are established i plan on letting the flowers and trees do the rest of the work. So how about the bird bath, how far away shuold i put that. Also we usually have a pool with chemicles in it, most likly they will find it, will that harm them? Thanks
     
  8. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    The bird bath can be close. It is only water. It needs to be closer than the pool. Hopefully it will keep them out of the pool. The pool water won't hurt the bees, but your family won't enjoy swimming with the bees.

    Open feeding in the spring can be done anywhere from 50 feet to 1/2 mile from the hive. Fall open feeding should be at least 200 feet from the hive. Fall robbing is a hundred times more apt to happen than spring robbing.
     
  9. TheWoodsman

    TheWoodsman New Member

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    So put the bird bath closer than the pool, and between 50-100 feet for my feeder. Shuold i have a default feeder up all the time or just for the beginning, and also by feeder we are talking about sugar water right, or do we use something else, thanks.
    Also thanks for the fall robbing tip
     
  10. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Yes bird bath closer than the pool and fill it with some gravels so the bees will have something to stand on and not drown.

    I only run a few hives and do not open feed, I prefer to use to top feeders to target individual hives that are light.

    Yes sugar water in the feeder.
     
  11. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    there are a lot of ways to feed bees and it really matter little here if your are talking about a langstroth hive or a top bar hive or whatever. feeding outside the hive in an open container use to be called pot feeding by most folks in the commercial world... that is you put some kind of pot out on the ground poured in sugar water and add some kind of floating material to provide a perch for the bee to land. feeder inside the hive are of various forms and may include frame feeders, top feeders and your plain old stick in the front door boardman feeder (also called a chicken waterer in the poultry industry but also likely the most risky feeder for feeding honeybees).

    I have fed using a lot of different feeder but at this particular I have found a sealable freezer bag to be one of the most reliable and cheapest means of getting some feed into a hungry hive. just fill the bag with syrup, seal the bag, place on top of the frames (actually I would guess you could place it anywhere within a hive???) and poke two set of hole in the top side with a fork and you are done. sometime I can even reuse the bag once.

    If you had some plans to do top bars I would think making plans for some kind of internal feeder like a frame feeder would be useful and an excellent project for scraps. most home made internal feeders you will need to seal... my preference in this regards is beeswax.