apiguard and honey supers / what to do with the particle filled supers?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by adamant, Jul 18, 2012.

  1. adamant

    adamant Member

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    i am going to treat with apiguard. i am getting it in the bucket with the thin metal sleeves that is used for placement on the apiguard. i have honey supers on. i was thinking to collect all the frames of partially uncapped honey and put them in a super and place them on a strong hive. i will treat all my hives except the one's with the honey supers. after those hives are done treatments i will remove the honey supers and place them on the treated hives. and treat the one's that had the supers on.. what do u think? good plain?
     
  2. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    adamant,
    i have to ask, why are your treating your hives with apiguard now with a honey flow on? apiguard, or any chemical used to kill mites is used outside of any honey flow, spring maybe dependent on temps but typically late summer, early fall......why not wait until your last honey flow, and then treat?
     

  3. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Though we like to think of bees as sticking 100% to their own hive, in truth, there is always a small (unintentional) amount of "drifting". This is one of the main ways that varroa is passed from one hive to the next.
    Because of this, it is important to treat ALL the hives in an apiary against varroa at the same time. In doing so, re-infestation is slowed down considerably. In Israel, the apiary advisary service tries to coordinate the treating against varroa to be carried out simultaneously throughout the whole country. This hasn't eliminated varroa, but our situation would probably be much worse if treatmment time wasn't coordinated.
    If you leave one of your hives untreated, you are inviting a rapid re-infestation of the treated hives.
    This is said in addition to riverbees very important comment about not treating hives CHEMICALLY during a honey flow. If your siuation is really bad and treaatment can't be delayed, try a non chemical method of treatment. [You can look them up in the apropriate topic of the forum]
     
  4. adamant

    adamant Member

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    thank you for your reply. looks like the flow stopped here.
     
  5. adamant

    adamant Member

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    good point. as a new bekeeper i never look at it that way..
     
  6. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Adamant:
    If your mites counts are spiking and you have to treat or risk collapse, you can use a product called Mite Away Quick Strip. It is a formic acid based product and it can be used during a nectar flow with honey supers left on.
    I haven't tried it yet so cannot attest to its efficacy.
     
  7. dragonfly130

    dragonfly130 New Member

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    I'm with Perry, Maqs is the best treatment with super's on. No residue and safe with super's on. Naturally occurs in honey.

    I used it last year and this one with good result's. You'll get some brood burn, possible supercedure and some bee loss. But it's not that bad. You just need to know what's to expect so you don't start panicking needlessly. Colonies will recover from it just fine.
     
  8. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    The flow is still on over here with sweet pepperbush, white clover, and swamp mallow. It's interesting how you're 10 miles away and there is no flow.

    I had inspected a couple of nucs and they were low on stores so I figured the flow was over. Then I inspected some hives packed with bees and they had lots of fresh nectar...hmm..seems to me that the nucs just didn't have the population needed to forage for all their needs at the time of my inspection.
     
  9. Zulu

    Zulu Member

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    MAQS is the way to go.
     
  10. adamant

    adamant Member

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    yep.. was into them saturday and there is honey! for a week and a half nothing so i thought things are shutdown!
     
  11. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    We had the same thing. It slowed down for a bit an then all of a sudden they're on to something!
     
  12. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

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    The keeps up here say August 1 for apiguard and two weeks later for a second treatment. From what I've learned so far the timing of treatment can be very area specific.

    If I listened to what was said well enough, They had figured out the timing in our area that treated right around when the queens generally stopped laying eggs during the Summertime dearth, and before the last flow of fall when the queen would be laying her winter brood. The man I spoke to hasn't lost a colony in 8 years so he must be doing something right.

    I plan on doing a mite count this week and then deciding if I'm going to treat in my first year.