Argh! Spraying again!

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Hobie, Jul 28, 2010.

  1. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    Just when I think the adjacent shrub nursery is trying to be bee-friendly, I hear tractors at 8pm and look out to see them spraying the fields right behind my house. I suspect they are spraying nasty pesticides, because they have been notifying me when they are going to spray ("less harmful"???) herbicides. What's worse, they were even spraying the dirt roadway that is the dividing line between their fields and my property. Why?

    The "good" part is it was in the evening, so most of the bees were not flying. There were, however, many of them hanging out on the front of the hive in the heat. I can't figure out if the nursery is trying to be accommodating or sneaky.

    The weeds in the field to the north of my house mysteriously all died, too. I am going to cal them and see if there is any chance I can buy a strip of land as a buffer zone. I know the answer will be "no", and I probably could not afford it.

    What irks me most is that, before I bought this place, I called the nursery and asked how often they sprayed the fields, and with what. They said, "Herbicides, maybe once or twice a year." In reality, they are out here nearly every week.

    There, I've had my vent.
     
  2. indypartridge

    indypartridge New Member

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    Ask them what they are spraying. Ask to see the MSDS (material safety data sheet) so you know what they are spraying and the effects.

    Dirt roads are sometimes sprayed with an oil mixture to keep the dust down.
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    If you don't ask, you think all kinds of negative thoughts.

    If you go over and ask, you may find that all your worry is for naught.

    In my opinion, a visit, not a phone call, is in order.
     
  4. cow pollinater

    cow pollinater New Member

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    If they're willing to tell you about herbicide use, I sincerely doubt that they're not telling you when they spray something really toxic. I live in a heavy ag area and we have a county program where anyone who is spraying can call and tell me what is being sprayed and where. I'm AMAZED at the response. I get seven or eight calls a day. Most are a week in advance when only two days is required. Half are for chemicals that aren't really a problem but they just wanted to make sure. A few have admitted that the only reason they mess with the county is to find out where the bees are... I still see spray on farms that ussually call me but there is alot of stuff that is so non-toxic that they wouldn't bother to call so I have to assume it's safe enough.

    Here's another way to look at it... The really good stuff that kills lots of bugs is way to expensive to dump on dirt roads. It's probably more like glyphosphate(harmless herbicide) or a pre-emergent, or just water to settle dust.
     
  5. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    cp, you were right, it was a pre-emergent.

    Well, they're out spraying again. This time they called me (yesterday) because it is a miticide. I went out early to close the bees in, but they are all bearded out front in this heat. So much for that plan. Hope the wind stays calm and the bees stay in the yard.

    Which makes me wonder on another note... do all the bees hanging out front mean they need more room? I don't have any more drawn comb, just foundation. I've got a SBB and the cover is shimmed for ventilation.
     
  6. rast

    rast New Member

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    Hobe, one solution for closing in bearded hives is nursery shade cloth draped over the whole hive and down on the ground. We use it for covering pallets of bees when moving them. The size of the weave is measured in % and I think its 50%.
    I think you'll probably find your bees are bearding more for hive temp. control, to keep the body heat outside.
     
  7. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    Thanks, rast! I wonder if the nursery would be so kind as to give me a few yards of shade cloth? Otherwise, I assume it is like the screening material they use on tents.
     
  8. rast

    rast New Member

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    "Otherwise, I assume it is like the screening material they use on tents."

    Usually black and a whole lot stronger, doesn't snag and tear as easily.
    Oh yeah, most hardwood shrub nurseries down here don't use it, mostly ferneries.