article for the state newsletter

Discussion in 'Bee News' started by BjornBee, Sep 28, 2009.

  1. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    Some of my other articles I have written had an organic/natural slant and were posted in the other forum. This one is from the angle of not beekeepers thinking outside the box, but what happens and the consequences when we ask others, such as farmers to think outside the box.

    Hope you enjoy......

    Thinking Outside the Box

    When CCD first hit the scene, congressional hearings were held, claims were made that Einstein said we would all die within four years without honey bees, movies were made, articles written, and some of this hyper-drama continues even today. Maybe that would be a good article for the future. But for now, lets focus on how all this could impact others into action. I’m sure there has been many more gallons of ice cream consumed, entomology department payrolls increased, and other benefits seen outside the bee industry. But what about some not so mentioned items. What long term impacts or trends have been set into motion that will have lasting consequences? And lets ask what happens when you ask others, or better yet, push others, into thinking outside their own boxes by the actions of the bee industry.

    I raised an eyebrow as I was talking to a couple farmers two years ago. They had casually mentioned a well known entomologist and asked me if I knew the name. I said yes. I asked how did they know the person? They went on to tell me about a presentation made to the fruit growers association a couple evenings prior, and the main topic was about using alternative pollinators. It kind of irked me to know that the same people researching CCD were the same ones telling farmers not to place all their eggs in the same basket and promoting alternative pollinators. But who could blame others when the bee industry itself keeps repeating the same doom and gloom message that the sky is falling. So it was not a surprise when I noticed this spring some cans of mason bees hanging from poles in one of the farms I pollinate. I mentioned the new mason bees cans to the farmer. He said one of the local Penn State extension employee was promoting their use and actually providing them free for the first year. I thought that was very convenient.

    Now the one thing that farmers do is talk. And they all know each other. Not much is missed on the grapevine. So I heard many comments and was contacted in both 2007 and 2008 about three frame pollination units that farmers were not happy with, especially after one of the largest pollination fee increases being passed on after CCD first hit. Seems some were trying to make up for lost hives by splitting too much and then raising fees at the same time.

    I also recently read about a study conducted in new Jersey that found out that 21 out 23 vine crop farms had enough native pollinators to adequately pollinate their crops. You do not need to look farm to find such articles and research being conducted. The message is out, the message is clear to farmers…Look into native pollinators! Seek other pollinators. The honey bees are in crisis! Protect yourself!

    The bee industry has forced others to look into other forms of pollination. Farmers are considering other avenues than paying for over priced, weak, or (put in their minds by beekeepers) that the honey bee may not be available in the future.

    It was no surprise last week when the farm that had mason bees placed on his farm cancelled his contract for next year. Although I never had CCD, and have not raised my fees in 4 years, he as well as other farmers have been inundated with the honey bees plight, the idea of other pollinators may be better or superior, and that they need to look into other means to protect themselves.

    The big mega operations, as well as almonds will always need bees. Having enough native pollinators from the surrounding countryside is not going to happen when you count plantings of one crop by “square milesâ€. But those smaller family farms, which are important to both large and smaller beekeeping operations, are asking if they really need the honey bees, looking into alternative pollinators, scaling back as research keeps coming forward suggesting the use of honey bees are not needed. And some farmers are looking into more crops that are self pollinating. And who can we thank for this….Beekeepers!

    The bee industry keeps shooting themselves in the foot, then dragging themselves down the street screaming for all to take notice. How much more bleeding can we take?

    Maybe CCD is more than just a bunch of migratory beekeepers needing to clean up their practice. Although being one who has been hammered in years past for even suggesting illegal chemicals were even being used, it does make me smile as I notice some claim they have far less CCD problems after good sound practices have been implemented. And if it is more than bad beekeeping, maybe we can get to the conclusion without too many more self inflicted gunshots to the feet.

    It is about time we start rallying the industry in many ways. We need to be aware of the public message sent forth and consequences put into motion. We need to protect our industry and become relative and important as providers of a product and service. After all, the sky is not falling, the food industry is not crashing, and there is no shortage of bees. But farmers have been forced to look “Outside the box†and they certainly are! I do not want to diminish the loss that many beekeepers suffered. I just want to point out industry trends and consequences that we all need to be aware of.

    Well, I got to run. I hear there is a new movie or some show coming on called “The Last Beekeeperâ€. I hope my farmers are not watching it!

    Take Care,
    Mike Thomas
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    A lot of good thoughts there, but, planning for the unknown has always been the best route to go. Three years ago, ccd was not looked on with hindsight as it is today. Even the beeks didn't know if there would be sufficient bees today.

    Hindsight is always 20-20.
     

  3. Charles

    Charles New Member

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    Good article bjorn. Thanks for the share :goodpost:
     
  4. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    good read and makes one think a little.

    G3
     
  5. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

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    OK article, but I still think that a combination of pollinators is and always will be the best course of action for everyone. I remember reading a study recently (I apologize that I can not remember where I read it anymore) that showed that honey bees actually collect more pollen and nectar when there are native bees present. So I think having a combination of honey bees, pollen bees, sweat bees, etc. is the most benefitial for everyone involved.

    PS - The food production industy is getting more and more strained. It's not just that pollination contracts cost more, it's that as a whole we're losing arable land, the population (demand for food) is increasing, aquifers are being depleted, etc. etc. etc... there's a long list of things that are going on right now that could drive the cost of food for consumers way up. That might be a good thing for farmers though.
     
  6. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    I agree with your comments SgtMaj.

    Maybe not about the farmers in the last sentence. It seems everyone makes money except the farmer....