Automatic hives because only open to harvest.

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by OscarPerone, Mar 23, 2010.

  1. OscarPerone

    OscarPerone New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hi all,

    Free detailed instructions for constructing and operating fully automatic hives, for which no bee knowledge is required of any kind, since only open to harvest.

    See please: (You can translate it, at the same page with google translator)

    http://www.oscarperone.com.ar/

    At your disposal.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

    Messages:
    1,399
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I do suppose you could take ANY hive set-up and not open it except for harvest, but Oh! the propolis and burr comb!
     

  3. beehandler

    beehandler New Member

    Messages:
    84
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    i don't think that would be legal in the u.s.a.
    no removable frames for inspection purposes.
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Illegal and unworkable. They would be dead within 2 years.
     
  5. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

    Messages:
    1,696
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    If I didn't want the enjoyment of beekeeping, I'd just go down the road and buy honey. :roll:
     
  6. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

    Messages:
    5,162
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I did not go to the website.

    What is an automatic hive?? Is there a spigot in the back you just put a jar under and open to fill it full of honey? ;)

    G3
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    G3 the site seems to be in Spanish... so I could not read the information on the site.

    G3... they use to make a little mock up wood hive with a filler spigot just like you described. It was really kind of a funny item to have in a fair situation only in how many folks though that was really how things worked.

    I ain't at all certain what motivates folks to the 'beehiver' mentality. I guess the ultimate statement of beehiver/ do nothing mental model would be to buy a package and install it in a open cavity in a tree. You then collect the crop when the tree dies.

    I do reckon if the only bees one could keep were somewhat to highly africanized one might not wish to open them up quite so often. Sadly supering hives up high will not keep africanized bees in the box and although huge surpluses have been reported for africanized bees in South Africa it appears a good bit of constant manipulation is required by the beekeeper to make this happen.
     
  8. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

    Messages:
    1,399
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Since I have a tendency toward being a "bee-haver," I thought I would comment.

    I got into beekeeping when we had a colony living in a barn wall where an addition was going to be added. We had let the bees live there for years, but now it was either kill them or remove them. I chose to remove them.

    My goal is to give the bees a good home. I am not pollinating for money, or selling honey. If my berry bushes do better, and I get a few pounds of honey, it is just icing on the cake. I believe that bees do better without constant meddling and disruption of their colony, so I have adopted a rather "hands off" approach. I do minimal inspections. I observe the entrance and SBB tray for signs of mites or other problems. I keep an eye on their space to add supers. Sometimes I will reverse boxes in spring. I can't help but think I wouldn't like a giant tearing the roof off my house every 2 weeks and rearranging the furniture.

    I do not prevent swarms, or re-queen on a schedule. If this makes me "not" a beekeeper, well, so be it.
     
  9. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

    Messages:
    1,696
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hobie,
    You take honey, use SBB, reverse boxes, add supers....you are a beekeeper. I'm not really sure who you are comparing yourself too, but you are like 90% of the beekeepers out there.

    I think you are far different than the crowd that takes it one step further, and as the above advertisement states...."You don't even need to have any bee knowledge"!

    The average beekeeper does not go in weekly or even enough actually to know whats happening. Most beekeepers do not requeen, and probably are more close to your management, than what you think. But....The fact that you are on a bee forum almost daily, learning, contributing, and expanding your bee knowledge, is far different than the crowd that seems to be popping up, selling a bill of goods, that maintaining hives, with absolutely no bee knowledge, and doing absolutely nothing except taking the supers off, and sells this as the way to go.

    Your a beekeeper. The other so called "Hands off" beekeepers, probably do more than they sometimes suggest. But it is also vastly different than selling the public the concept and idea that becoming a beekeeper with absolutely no knowledge, and that hives are now "automatic" and requires no skill.

    The above advertisement has been posted on every bee forum allowing it to be posted. Each forum has one post. And I give no credit for a person selling a poor concept, and cares no more beyond the marketing of his product.
     
  10. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

    Messages:
    1,399
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Well, thank you, Bjorn. Much appreciated :)

    Personally I have no problem if someone wants to plop a beehive in their yard for pollination, or to help save the bees, and never touches it. It is an issue, however, if they would steal all the honey and give nothing back.
     
  11. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hobie:
    It sounds to me like your 'purpose' in keeping bees is a bit different from my own reason for keeping bees. purpose does not define bee keeper or bee hivers as far as I can determine??

    If you prepare yourself in regards to information and then employ some manipulation of a hive to obtain some end results then as far as I can tell you are a bee keeper.

    historically the beehiver/beekeeper argument goes back a long long ways. I think Bjorn has the two sides of argument well stated or positioned.

    ps... even from time to time an old dog (I would guess if it was a beehiver or beekeeper old dog wouldn't matter so much??) can learn a new tricks as I have recently from Hobie in the most recent time frame.
     
  12. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

    Messages:
    1,399
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Why thank you. Although I don't remember saying anything noteworthy, your comment just made my day. :)
     
  13. camero7

    camero7 Member

    Messages:
    715
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    18
    I've read Oscar's site pretty closely. this system is designed for keeping bees in Africanized areas using African Bees. Wouldn't work up here IMO.