Autumn Is Here, What Are You Doing For Your Bees?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by riverbee, Sep 23, 2012.

  1. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    What are you beeks doing now in the fall, and what are you all doing for your bees?.....winter comes too soon. anything different than last year or prior years?
    (you all know what i'm doing different :lol:)
    how do your queens/ bees 'look' ?
    anything you would like to add to the discussion here.
    :grin:
     
  2. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I am still pulling a small bit of honey here. At the same time I am removing excluder and putting on entrance reducers and 'tipping' hives to check on weight.

    ps... great links Americasbeekeeper. the first short and sweet and the latter much more detailed. 'west of the cascades' must mean where????
     
  4. larry tate

    larry tate New Member

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    Last minute sugar shakes, distributing honey frames around from those with excess to those with less, beetle traps, reducing entrances, changing out rotted-damaged equipment and weedeating. Always something needed to be done with the bees! Now to get spring equipment ready, repaint-repair and order.
     
  5. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I am surprised that my southern neighbours are already reducing entrances? You must like to get a jump on winter preps there. (or maybe our bees up here are a little tougher) :wink:
    I will be going through those hives of mine that got MAQS to see if there was a problem with queen failure and then any that are light will get either frames of capped honey and/or fed.
    Too early to think about wrapping, etc. but maybe reduce entrances?
     
  6. Daniel Y

    Daniel Y New Member

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    I am working on getting my bees treated for the winter. I am a bit behind on that issue due to the late summer throwing some unexpected issues at me. This is my first year and although I had an overall understanding of keeping bees before I started. I have studied for more detailed information as the season has progressed. IN August I got a call about bees that needed to be removed from a house. Doing my fist trap out became a secondary and unexpected addition. and it sort of derailed my entire beekeeping effort. I did get two nucs out of it so far though. But again that adds to my need to learn faster. I now have two nucs goign into winter, a nice strong hive I am working on. feeding everything simply to play it safe and pretty much running two weeks behind on everything.

    My first attempt at making an AO vaporizer was tested and failed yesterday. so I made a second design yesterday and it will be tested today. If it works I have my bees treated for everything this winter.

    Inspections have shown they are winding down although there are still bees leaving the hive every day I don't think much gathering is going on. My full size hive has plenty of honey and I have them making more from sugar water for the nucs.

    Other than that I have to figure out if I am goign to wrap. not wrap. put insulation on top of the hives and how I am goign to ventilate. I have about a month to get it figured out. It's been a fun year but I also realize my time factor has been off the charts. I have spent far to many hours at beekeeping than can be justified with just one or two hives. IT was necessary but next year I will be more focused on being ,ore effective with my time. THis years multile meddlings with teh ebes has given me much more intuition. It has been necessary and productive.
     
  7. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    After having treated them against varroa about three weeks ago, followed by checking to see that the queens were okay and laying and making sure enough honey was inside, there's nothing more for me to do. After I removed my honey (late July) I reduced the entrances to about 1/3 the width of the hive. Winters in my location aren't particularly cold, maybe i'll get one or two light frosts during the winter, but basically, the bees can fly most of the way through the winter.
    What I really should start thinking about is what I'm going to do in the late winter/early spring to get them to develop well for the citrus flowering in March.
     
  8. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    The bees are spending time propolizing the entrance shut so may as well install reducer and save the girls all the work.
     
  9. lazy shooter

    lazy shooter New Member

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    My three mature hives have honey and brood and pollen stores. The telescoping covers have been wedged up a bit to increase ventilation for our hot (60 days of 100 F temps), so I will take the wedges out and be ready for winter. We have some freezing days (probably 60) from the middle of November through mid March. Many of those days will be an early morning freeze of 20 degrees F and then warm up to 45 or 50 degrees by mid afternoon. We have very few freezes that last two days. The short answer should have been NOTHING.

    I have three five frame, medium frame nucs, that I have been attempting to feed, but they didn't take the syrup. They are finding forage somewhere. I will try them again in a couple of weeks.