Bad omen?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Bens-Bees, Aug 18, 2010.

  1. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

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    I've been seeing some goldenrod blooming here already... I'm thinking this is a really bad thing for it to be blooming so early. Tell me I'm wrong but doesn't the early bloom mean that it will stop blooming that much earlier as well, which will in turn leave the bees needing an extra month's worth of stores to make it through the winter? That could prove to be REALLY tough on the bees.
     
  2. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    you can never tell A lot depends on the weather if the weathers right there may be an extended bloom or you might end up feeding to get the hives ready for winter
     

  3. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    I have not seen any yet, I am just wondering if we are going to have a hard winter this year.
     
  4. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    The goldenrod is just breaking bud now here in SW Mo.(about two weeks early) but the bees don't work it here, it's rare to see bees on our goldenrod???. The aster dosen't have buds on it yet and they do work it hard.I put out to fields of buckweat for back up :thumbsup: . Jack
     
  5. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

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    Jack, I wish I had the land to put out buckwheat... I'd be sowing it right now if I did... I'm seeing a lot of goldenrod up by me... so I'm thinking I'm going to have to plan on heavy feeding. UGH!

    Why can't nature just cooperate?
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    likely more important than the time of blooming is the quantity of water in the soil. at least here without water in the ground you can have bloom and no nectar flow. matter of fact in the 7 or 8 states that I have lived and kept bees it worked there in exactly the same way.
     
  7. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    Goldenrod started here in JULY. I'm hoping that the bees are taking advantage and stocking up so there won't be a shortage. Won't help if it crystalizes, though.

    Interestingly, the New England Aster is just starting, on close to proper schedule.
     
  8. Tia

    Tia New Member

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    According to my beekeeping calendar, goldenrod starts August 1. I wouldn't imagine TN to be much different than NC. I have it all over my property, but no blooms yet; just green. It's been so dry; we really need some rain for it to get going.
     
  9. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    There are many varieties of goldenrod,my fields and the neighbors fields are full of it (fence rows mostly) and it's flustering not to see bees working it when other beekeeper are getting a flow from theres, ours must have BO :confused: . The bees will work my buckwheat in the mourning and after 11:00am you won't find a honey bee on it, but butterflies,wasp, bumbble bees and many other insects work it till dark. Here in SW Mo. we have several wild mints that bloom in the fall like the Beefstake mint and the bees are all over it,do any of you in bordering states have the wild mints? Yeh, Ben, mother nature knows how to keep us busy. Jack
     
  10. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

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    Well we have no shortage of rain lately... so maybe I'm fretting over nothing?
     
  11. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    Jack writes:
    do any of you in bordering states have the wild mints?

    tecumseh:
    here in texas we have a spring time mint plant called locally horse mint that is a good producer and give almost all the local honey just of trace minty twang.
     
  12. Tia

    Tia New Member

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    Since we're talking nectars, can any of you tell me why my girls aren't visiting the sumac? I was led to believe that they liked sumac, so I didn't pull up the little sumac trees that sprout all over my property. They're loaded with flowers and while the other pollinators are very busy, I see none of my girls regardless of time of day.
     
  13. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Here in SW Mo. we have three varieties Fragrant, smooth and winged,one of these they don't work very good ( don't rember which one :confused: ). Like i've read Tec. wright, it could be the soil type that the plant is growing in that makes it produce nectar (like our goldenrod).Another mystery to me, the girls love sweet clover and will work it all day long, but we have a larg black fly (even looks like it has a stinger) that works it and if they are on it the girls won't be??? Jack