badgers

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by ronsin, May 11, 2013.

  1. ronsin

    ronsin Member

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    have just moved a few hies onto a crop of rapeseed. farmer jnfomed me there are badgers on the land and am a bit concerned as have heard in the past about badgers knocking hives over. have put bees on a stand about ten inches high and have driven a couple of stakes into ground and lashed to stand .also put a strap over hives anyone know of any detterent heard a theary once that if you peed around base of stands it would detter them however i am a bit dubious as my bees are a real fiesty lot and i dont fancy getting my tackle out in front of these ladies. would appreciate any advice that doesnt include urination thanks
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Urine in a battle hung in the area. The older it is, the better it works. Don't have to be done on site.
     

  3. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    If human urine is an effective badger repellant, I like Iddees idea of bottling it and bringing it in, however, a thought popped into my head as I was reading your first post. I use human hair as a deer repellant around my garden. I get it from my sister, who is a beautician. I don't know if it would be effective for badgers or not. Please keep us posted. Also, if you decide to do direct urine application, please post a video. :lol:
     
  4. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    "would appreciate any advice that doesnt include urination thanks"

    electric fencing. i don't like to lose hive's, and i don't like snarky hives because of visiting critters. we have them here, (and bears) they are industrious powerful critters, and will work until they get hives tipped over and bottom boards chewed/clawed to creation if they have the mindset. having the hives strapped down helps, but won't keep them from coming back.

    urine.....when it rains or wears off.....
     
  5. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    "Tackle"
    :lol: :rolling: :rotfl: :lol:
     
  6. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    How's about taking your (or anybody's) dog there for a walk. They are usually quite cooperative when it comes to urinating on static items that they pass on their way. :beg: It seems to me that a hive would be almost irresistable.:mrgreen:
     
  7. ronsin

    ronsin Member

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    think i will go with iddees idea anybody know if badgers eat hive contents or is it just curiosity that causes problem , <mentioned to wife about getting my tackle out and she reckons no problem as theyed have to find it first>:???::???:
     
  8. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    "anybody know if badgers eat hive contents or is it just curiosity that causes problem"

    just like bears they like the eggs and larvae, a nice snack, lots of delicious protein....
     
  9. lazy shooter

    lazy shooter New Member

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    We have a few Badgers. They are very smart, and they are extremely nocturnal. I had one that found how to get into my calf feeders one year, and it became an expensive pain in the butt. I finally managed to live trap him and send him down the road. They are hard to trap. Fortunately, they have not bothered my bees. Waiting........
     
  10. ronsin

    ronsin Member

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    thanks to all for advice sorry gunsmith afraid video is a no no
     
  11. tmrschessie

    tmrschessie New Member

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    Howdy, first this is referencing badgers. They work both day and night. They are not repelled by human or dog urine, or much else for that matter. They are near the top of the food chain in most areas. They are realitively easy to trap if you know where they are....I doubt electric fence will keep them out, they can burrow under it in short order. With all this said, I have not had any trouble with them and bees. Maybe I was lucky. We have a lot of them in the area here. I am a trapper all winter and take several every season for local farmers. Tom
     
  12. lazy shooter

    lazy shooter New Member

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    @Trmchessie:

    I have live traps that I use to trap and raccoons. I deemed it a bit small for a badger and had one made that was larger. Maybe it was the live trap and maybe is was because the badger was not near its den, but it took me several attempts to trap it. It was fish food that finally lured it into the live trap.

    I use game cameras quite a bit, and I have often captured pictures of badgers, but in the last 10 years, I have only seen a badger in day light three times. Out badgers seem to be quite nocturnal. We have a small badger population. In my area, badgers are the top of the food chain. We have lots of coyotes, but I don't believe a pack of coy dogs are up to a badger. Pound per pound badgers are bad news.
     
  13. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    "I doubt electric fence will keep them out, they can burrow under it in short order."

    i have an electric fence tom, and it does.