Baiting

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Beeboy, Mar 8, 2013.

  1. Beeboy

    Beeboy New Member

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    I need some advice. I got a phone call this morning, about doing a cutout in a home. The is empty and this lady is fixing to move into it, but there some bees that taken up residence in a wall. The out side of the house is rock, and you can see their entrance where they come and go. We cut the Sheetrock out in three or four spots, and couldn't find anything. In the attic by the fireplace we moved a little mortar and there a couple bees there. The bees are somewhere in that fireplace, so it's impossible to get to them with busting down the chimney.


    I told the lady she could call an exterminator if she was in a hurry to get them out, or if she could wait for me to get back in a few days I would try to bait them out of their little spot.

    She chose to wait on me. My biggest challenge is its an hour drive to her house.

    From what the neighbors say it is a huge hive, and has been there 4-5 years.

    The opening is 8'2" off of the ground so I am going to put a bait box up there on a stand.

    Any advice you folks have for me would be greatly appreciated.

    I hear you put lemon oil in the bait box, but beyond that I don't know else to do.

    help.
     
  2. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    get with iddee here on the forum he can give you the ends and outs of a trap out using a cone. A bait hive with lemon grass oil wil not get them out of the wall without the cone:thumbsup:
     

  3. Beeboy

    Beeboy New Member

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    Paging iddee. Paging iddee!
     
  4. Lburou

    Lburou Member

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    While you are boning up on the ins and outs of your situation, you might want check this link as well. :)
     
  5. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    A bait hive will only "maybe" catch a swarm, they will not leave their established colony to move into an empty cold box.

    Do a trap out on them, it will take 60 to 70 days to do a complete one.
     
  6. Beeboy

    Beeboy New Member

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    So how do I do a trap out?
     
  7. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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  8. Beeboy

    Beeboy New Member

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    That is not just good, that is very excellent! Thank you!
     
  9. DLMKA

    DLMKA New Member

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    I think I just got lucky there :roll:. Big ego boost to get threads referred to almost a year later. The Hogan method does work, I got the queen and they're coming out of winter still looking good.
     
  10. Beeboy

    Beeboy New Member

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    I wanted to post an update on this project.

    I put a piece of plywood of the rock wall (approx. 2'x2'). Drilled a hole in it, in line with where the bees where entrance/exit & attached a pvc pipe to it about a foot long.

    I cut a hole in one of my old bee boxes big enough for the other end of the pvc pipe to fit in tightly. So I have this setup with the bee having to go through the pvc pipe to get out, & when they do they are in my box. I left them that way for a few days, then I put two frames of brood in there with both sealed & unsealed brood in it.

    Yesterday was 17 days since I put the brood in there.

    The lady that I doing the project for called me on Monday night & told me there was a swarm on a tree just outside the hive, so I went down there yesterday & captured the swarm & looked at my project.

    There are a lot of bees working that brood with a lot of queen cells that have been made, & at least one queen that has hatched. We could actually hear a queen piping when inspecting the hive, but could never positively identify the queen, but we know there is a least one queen there.

    I wanted to take them home & have another start but didn't because I don't have anymore brood. I am down to one hive at home & I had to bum some brood from my brother to put in that hive so that they could make a new queen there also. (kudos to my brother for providing the brood for my hive at home, & my project...thanks bro.)

    My plan is to give that queen time to start laying (2-3 weeks) so that I will have some brood to leave there so that they can make another queen after I take a start from them.

    The biggest problem with this project is, it is an hour drive to it, but that gave me plenty of time to wipe that stupid grin off of my face (from being so happy with my project) before I got back to the family...so it's not that bad.

    So yesterday I went from one hive to two hives, with high hopes of another hive within a couple of weeks.

    Thanks to all for your advice. I love it!
     
  11. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    :thumbsup: :lol: :mrgreen:
    Sounds like you are going to have a fun year. :wink:
     
  12. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    You could solve that problem by taking some of your family along with you on the trip. That could give you some nice "quality time" with your wife or children, get them involved in your beekeeping and even have an extra pair or two of hands with you should you need them. :clap:
     
  13. Beeboy

    Beeboy New Member

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    I always take anyone who is willing. Both my daughter & my son has gone with me on this trip, but my daughter is the one that helps me inspect a hive. She likes it already, yet she doesn't like honey. My son loves honey, but doesn't care for beekeeping.
     
  14. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Jack Sprat could eat no fat.His wife could eat no lean.And so between them both, you see,They licked the platter clean.
    :lol:
     
  15. Beeboy

    Beeboy New Member

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    I was able to steal my first batch of bees from this bait out. I got a very strong nook out of it. If nothing goes I will be ready for a full size box soon. The brood that I had put into the bait box had several queen cells on it, and when I was putting the frames into my nook this morning I got to watch a queen emerge from her cell! That was very satisfying. I put more brood in the bait box last night and will go back in a couple of weeks and I think I will be able to start another nook then. I will give this one to me brother though as he had help me with this project.


    I also captured two swarms off of this hive this week as well, so I went from one hive to four! So I am a very happy beekeeper today!
     
  16. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    and thanks for updating us ALL as to how things worked out. most folks can learn as much from failures and mistakes as they can from absolute success <which is to suggest I am glad it did work out for you but no one here needs to hold back when things don't work out exactly to plan.