Bear Facts ???

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by brooksbeefarm, Jun 28, 2013.

  1. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    At our last bee club meeting, we had a speaker from the Mo. State Conservation Dept. on the subject of black bears. He said they will avoid humans and will run if you make a load noise if you see him before he sees you? that they have poor eye sight and will stand on there hind feet to look around if they hear something, and just because they are on there hind feet they are not in a attack mode? I ask him about if a person got between the sow and her cubs by accident, what action to take? He said that is a miss conception, that they will attack you every time, that if you just keep on walking away that they will just watch you if you keep on going?? He said they have seen cubs hung in fences hollowing and the mother go off and leave them. I thought i would ask some of you who live in bear country about this, it goes against most everything i've read and seen on TV. Most of our bears are south of I-44 hwy, but are in some of the northern areas that i have bee yards and he said they are moving north:eek:. Jack
     
  2. BSAChris

    BSAChris New Member

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    I lived in northern Minnesota most of my life - black bear country - and although I have never had the misfortune of being caught between mother and cubs, my advice is to get out of there quickly but without making a whole lot of racket (ie. don't run screaming with your arms thrashing down every twig in your path).
    What they lack in eyesight (which is not poor) they make up with their great sniffing abilities. However, they are one of your more shy bears and they are generally not aggressive - although I suppose in the right conditions they would be. Best to go the other way if you see one.
     

  3. CeeGee

    CeeGee New Member

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    I do know that they will run if you start banging pans and yelling at a campsite they've stumbled (or more likely followed their nose) in to, or even off the front porch when I was a kid. They actually are quite timid.
    Now, the sow and her cubs? I don't know, but personally, I would hightail it out and never want to get in between!
     
  4. lazy shooter

    lazy shooter New Member

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    Hmmm, I know a bit about bare facts, but I don't know anything about bear facts. :)
     
  5. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    Jack keep your bears. :grin: They just had a write up in our local paper that they have migrated into Eastern Kansas
     
  6. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    I worked in the bush in British Columbia for about 15 years. I've seen hundreds of bears and come face to face with perhaps a couple of dozen (including a few grizzlies). Your coservation officer is pretty much right on the money. Most black bears are fairly easily intimidated and do not seek out confrontation. The exception to the above is bears that have been habituated to human contact, or have learned to associate humans with food scraps. Bears don't take very long to get used to having people around. In as little as a week of feeding on garbage, they will stop running away even from warning shots. If you encounter bear cubs, the best thing you can possibly do is slowly and calmly leave the area the same way you came in. That way you reduce your chance of getting between the sow and the cubs. If the cubs are in a tree, the sow already knows you're there and has sent them up for safety. She will huff and click her teeth to get you to leave, but seldom make aggressive moves.
    Grizzlies are a bit tougher to deal with, but I don't think you have those.
     
  7. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    jack, from my own experience, (growing up in montana around black bears, and grizzlies; and living in an area of wisconsin habitated by black bears), black bears for the most part, will avoid human contact, or are 'timid' (sort of 'afraid of you as you are of them'), even when you accidentally stumble across them. they 'hesitate', then get out of there like you do....they may or may not stand up, but they will hesitate with their noses in the air, and they will look right at you, and off they go, and so will you (after you froze when you encountered one). they run like he$$ one direction and you run like he$$ the other direction.....:lol: been plenty of times had black bears wander through a river i was fishing, to cross too close in front of me, to fill my waders with more than just water; cross a hiking path in front of me.....or stumbled across them berry picking. (where there is one there's another). i worked in a couple national parks, and for the forest service through my teen and college years. was never unfortunate enough to stumble on a mother black bear and cubs close up......err......except a couple times. my opinion is if she stands up and there's cubs..........(makes you really alert) we were always trained to think that she would charge, (and certain sounds she made) to back out slowly, quietly, and if she charged to not run or climb a tree.....roll up in a ball, cover the head, and with your pack, if you didn't drop it while running from her. :lol: (who's going to think rationally and not run like you know what?!)
    not making fun, but there are more grizzly maulings then there are black bear maulings. pistolpete said "Grizzlies are a bit tougher to deal with",...........with grizzlies, there is no mercy.
    black bears are and have become accustomed to 'human population', so are getting 'immune' to attempts to chase them off; noise, gun shots, etc. they will keep coming back to a food source as long as it is there; irregardless of what the food source is or where it is. as far as beehives, the only thing that will stop or keep a black bear from raiding your hives is a good fencer.
    btw.....when's lunch....or....what's for lunch.....:lol: (ps jack, couldn't help myself :grin:)

    Whens lunch.jpg
     
  8. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    I use to take bees into the mountains for fireweed used the bear fence on one yard and set 8 hives at another location. I put 4 hives on a pallet, supered the hives and placed stucco wire over and around the 4 hives, wired the tops to the sides and the sides to the pallet. when I returned the bears had been trying to get into the hives they had broken the welds on the stucco wire in places. and left a few claw and tooth marks on the super corners and bottom board landing strip.
    Want a good bear sensor get a little dog and take it with you. if there are bears in the area and the dog can smell them, it will roll in cow shit so they smell like cow rather than the bears next meal.