Bearing Fruit!

Discussion in 'General Gardening' started by Slowmodem, Aug 17, 2013.

  1. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    I've had some fruit trees for a couple of years, but with the dry hot weather, they hadn't done so well. Plus now that my parents live in the little house down in front, and he likes to garden and work in the yard, they've done much better. We'll have peaches and figs for the first time this year! :D

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  2. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Looks great Greg! Have you ever thought of growing apricots? I love them but don't think they would do well up here.
     

  3. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    I think Dad may have planted one or two. Maybe nectarines, too. I'm not sure. I like to keep the tags on the trees so I'll remember what they are, but he says they might restrict their growth. ::shrug:: I donno. :D
     
  4. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Enjoy the figs, but don't expect the bees to visit them. The other trees are another matter---they are good for both you and the bees. You can easily move the tags to a smaller side branch and not worry about them restricting growth. Truth be told, soon enough you'll remember each tree without needing a tag to tell you what it is.
    Don't forget to thank your dad for his foresight. :thumbsup:
     
  5. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    I thank him every time I see him! :) And I'm thankful for being able to provide a place for them to enjoy themselves in these latter years.
     
  6. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Enjoy Exodus:20:12 :thumbsup:
     
  7. Walt B

    Walt B Active Member

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    Congratulations on the fruit. Several years ago we planted apple, pear, and almond trees. The grasshoppers had there way with them. :frustrated: Now we have a couple of pears and a couple of almonds, and neither, after the first year, has even blossomed. The grasshoppers usually have eaten all the leaves by the end of July. Each year seems to be the "first year" for them.

    Walt
     
  8. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm Active Member

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    Walt, sounds like it's time for free range chickens and turkeys.:thumbsup: Jack
     
  9. Walt B

    Walt B Active Member

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    Jack, We let our first batch of chickens free range. A highway borders one side of our property. We looked out one day and it looked like the ladies were trying to hitch hike into Waco, "Hey trucker guy. Going my way?" :grin: We figured it was just a matter of time until they ended up being hood ornaments on the trucks. :shock: Now they're kept in an inside/outside coop.

    Walt
     
  10. tmrschessie

    tmrschessie New Member

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    Nice, we have a single apple tree...no fruit for 5 years. Got honey bees again and this year it has fruit for the first time. Tom
     
  11. tmrschessie

    tmrschessie New Member

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    Well the wife and I picked the one tree we have yesterday. Got a full 5 gallon pail full from the one tree. Have a few more tomatoes to put up then the apples. Tom
    14-Sept-13 002.jpg
     
  12. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    My pecan trees are being picked clean of their crop (a potentially good one) by an invasive species of parrot. Very aggressive birds that have been chasing away mnay natural species we are used to. On Tuesday I expect my oldest son to bring me his BB rifle, to save what I can of the crop. It has another two months to go before the nuts are really ripe and ready for picking/collecting. :hunter:
     
  13. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I put in 2 peach trees and 2 pear trees in winter 2010/2011, in preparation for my bees. One of the peach trees just died last week, but it wasn't just drought, my 2 year old lab and a pup played pull the branches off the tree back in May, I didn't think it would live this long, so much bark damage. Those dogs haven't touched a tree since, I didn't beat them, but I chased them around the yard waving branches and yelling and they decided I was nuts. (the lab finally caught on, this is not our first go round.) The other peach has 3 or 4 peaches still on it that have never ripened this summer. It had a fence around it during the great tree plucking event.

    Pears don't do much. They bloom and they have leaves, but they are young and the weather hasn't been kind. I think the hens keep the grasshoppers down, and there is privacy fence around their lot so the hoards of hoppers have to go UP - seems to reduce the problem a bit. A Sprinkler calling every grackle for miles is real good for my garden grasshopper situation, I run one every morning, must be 50 birds from sparrows up out there getting a shower and breakfast.
     
  14. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Gypsi, I hope your pear trees are of two different varieties. Generally, pears suffer from poor fruit set when self polinated or polinated by the same variety of tree. Before the field near my house was sacrificed to suburban expansion (about thirteen years ago), there was a pear orchard near me. It was planted with two varieties, one (Spedona) as a marketed fruit and a second variety (I forget its name) with small pears that were there only for the benefit of cross polination.
    ​To the best of my knowledge, peaches don't have that problem.
     
  15. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    they are 2 varieties but they seem to bloom 2 weeks apart. The bees like them, lol. I don't think I am going to add a 3rd pear tree til the drought breaks, and I am beginning to wonder if that will ever happen. We need a pipeline from flood zones into north Texas.
     
  16. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Efmesch and Gypsy bring up a good point about cross pollination. It deserves a thread of its own in the spring but I will start discussing it here so we can think about it over the winter and it may be relevant to members south of the equator.
    Plant that require cross pollination will not produce fruits with out the blooming of other compatible plant species blooming at the same time, and the bees visiting both species at the same time.
    There are ways around this, by trapping or harvesting pollen from a compatible plant species the pollen can be frozen and saved to when it is needed. The effectiveness and vitality of the pollen diminishes rapidly so it must be harvested regularly from a trap and kept frozen to ensure its vitality. The collected pollen can be placed in a pollen insert when the bees are visiting the trees that need pollinating. The bees leaving the hive travel thru the insert picking up pollen grains from the insert and transport it on their body hairs, cross pollinating the flowers as they do.
    The pollen can be trapped or harvested direct from flowers of a compatible plant species or can be obtained thru a grower supply store.
     
  17. Minz

    Minz Member

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    I got some fresh figs at the bee picnic this year. My bride right away said ‘great that is the one tree he does not have’. What type do you guys recommend for the wet zone 8a?
    Last year the guy we hunt with introduced me to bud grafting. Of the 8 I did 8 took. Of the regular type of grafting I did I got one of 8 to take.
    I also got apricots for the first time, bushel of peaches, my apples have some new pest that rots out the entire side of the apple.
    My Italian prune is 3 now without a single fruit. I have 3 other plums right by it and looking for a late blooming prune to graft to it.
     
  18. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    If you're on the lookout for interesting fruit trees, I'd recommend you try Japanese Loquat (Diasporus kaki). The tree itelf is beautiful, with large symmetrical simple leaves and it bears a delicious fruit that is rarely sold in stores because of its short shelf life. It is evergreen and mildly cold tolerant. If your winters aren't too long on the below freezing days, it might be worth a try. I'm pretty sure it is self-polinating.
     
  19. Minz

    Minz Member

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    A lot of nursery stock comes from the Willamette valley here so it is generally pretty cheap. Getting a bare root tree in spring is $10-14 depending on how fancy it is. I tried to get a persimmon and they want $150 at the nursery and $40 at the discount places. I like the unusual but I am simply to cheap to pay the price for them.
    Not unusual for a lot of 100 trees to go for $150. Again though generic apples / pears / cherries.
     
  20. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm Active Member

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    Minz, come to Mo. the persimmon tree is a evasive tree here, you can have all you want free. I'm thinking were not talking the same type of persimmon tree.:???: Jack