Bee Colony/Queen Bee Killed!!

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by RAK, Sep 6, 2010.

  1. RAK

    RAK New Member

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    I decided to go check on my bees today. They are getting lots of mint honey right now in Idaho. I opened all my hives up and Extracted capped honey.(((I extract honey every week. Yep that how fast they work here))) However, in one Italian hive there were 8-9 capped queen cells. That got me worried. I looked for the queen and could not find her.

    Could she get stuck in the excluder or died from transporation? I had this hive in the Mountains last week. Last week I extracted, Checked on the queen, and transported the hive to Idaho where my other hives are. The hive was securely tied with straps. The entrance was closed with a special Net Transport Closer.Last Friday was he last day I saw here.


    I calculated that the Virgin queens will be out in 6-7 days, so I decided I should make a colony. The next month will be fairly warm here, so the queen should be able to mate properly.

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    Here is the picture I have in my brain for making a colony.
    1. four frames of closed brood from my other hives.
    2. one frame of honey.
    3. one frame with two closed queen cells

    Put queens in the middle.
    I have drones from other hives that should mate with her.

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    What happens if the queen comes out a few days earlier than the brood? Will the queen mate with other types of drones? I have 12 other hives with drones (Italians)(Carpathians)(Russians) to mate. I never made a colony before and I don't want to screw things up.

    Also this is the first time I had a queen disappear. I don't think she died of a natural death. The colony was strong and a week ago she laid four frames of eggs!!

    What will bees do without a queen? They were calm when I opened them today.

    I am 100% sure the queen is missing.

    Anyway, I feel like I am rambling. Any advice will help.

    Friendly comments welcome!
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Re: Bee Colony/Bee Killed!!

    Add the words "and bees" to number one and you have a great plan.
     

  3. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Re: Bee Colony/Bee Killed!!

    You need enough nurse bees on the capped brood to keep it warm/cool.
     
  4. samo's beekeeping

    samo's beekeeping New Member

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    Re: Bee Colony/Bee Killed!!


    1 . not only closed brood it must have all ages brood
    2 . the frames with brood must be full of nurses bees
    3 . you can put 3-4-5 frames, as you like
    4 . if the nurse bees are not enough you can add from another beehive(only bees)
    5 . i put 3 queen cells one big one small and one medium
    6 . feed them well after operetion
    good luck :thumbsup:
     
  5. RAK

    RAK New Member

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    Re: Bee Colony/Bee Killed!!

    Thank you for the replies. If I make a colony, would I have to take the colony away from Hives. Theoretically the bees will try to go back to their original hive. Is that correct?
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    snip..
    Could she get stuck in the excluder or died from transporation?

    tecumseh:
    at one time I move a lot of bees from east Texas to the very western edge of North Dakota. we ESTIMATED that in the loading and unloading queen loss was somewhere between 7 and 10%. if circumstances (weather) moved against you this estimate could be substantially greater.

    mix brood is a good idea since the unsealed stuff keeps the brood bees busy and capped brood because this insure you will have some emerging adult bees in two weeks time.

    there is more than a bit of nuisance in making up splits, but as a general rule early spring splits should have more live bees (to keep the brood warm) and less brood and fall splits more brood and less live bees.

    as I think samo suggest??? feeding splits is of primary concern (at least if you want to show any success from the endeavor).

    drones for mating with the newly emerging queens.... it requires approximately 2 weeks for drones to mature within a hive before they are able to pass along any genetic material. actually unless you are into some kind of rigorous breeding program (actively pursuing inbreeding) you would hope to have as much diversity in the drone population as is possible to limit any problems of like kind sex alleles. for most small time beekeeper in this regards the move diversity in the drone population the better.