Bee comb in hives is not vertical on frames

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Scott Sarlay, Aug 1, 2017.

  1. Scott Sarlay

    Scott Sarlay New Member

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    I am new to beekeeping and hoping someone can answer a few questions for me. I got my first hive and bees early this year. I have noticed that my bees did not create their comb/wax in my bee box vertically on the frames. My box has 10 frames in it and instead of creating their comb/wax vertically on each frame they created it across each frame. I can not remove the frames now without removing all 10 frames at once. Why did they not create their comb/wax vertically on each frame so they frames could be removed?

    Thanks.
     
  2. ccjersey

    ccjersey Member

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    That is the reason for foundation! You didn't say, but if you had foundation *******I guess you only have to rotate your hive a quarter turn and the bees will be lined up with the frames.*******
    ******* denotes sarcasm/humor!

    The whole point of hive design is to guide the bees to draw their comb on the removable frames. Bee keepers that do not use whole foundation of some type usually use a wax starter strip hanging down about an inch from the top bar to get them started right.
     

  3. ccjersey

    ccjersey Member

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    That is the reason for foundation! You didn't say, but if you had foundation *******I guess you only have to rotate your hive a quarter turn and the bees will be lined up with the frames.*******
    ******* denotes sarcasm/humor!

    The whole point of hive design is to guide the bees to draw their comb on the removable frames. Bee keepers that do not use whole foundation of some type usually use a wax starter strip hanging down about an inch from the top bar to get them started right.
     
  4. Scott Sarlay

    Scott Sarlay New Member

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    For over $600 you would think that would would have been included in the setup I bought. Especially since it said it was a "complete" kit.


     
  5. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Member

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    can you post a few pictures....check with the supplier you bought from to make sure they didnt forget to include the plastic foundation pieces in your "complete kit"... if they did or it wasnt included you can still straighten out the hive when you get them...
     
  6. ccjersey

    ccjersey Member

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    I was watching a Michael Bush video last night and he described turning a badly "cross combed" super upside down on something and breaking the box loose and lifting it off first before separating the frames however you can with the least damage to brood combs.

    He reiterated what I have heard from others.... it is not easy or usually necessary to try to save the honey combs during the process of straightening out a mess like that. They are usually just too soft. Just use rubber bands and put the brood and perhaps some pollen combs back in the frames as straight as possible and let the bees build on that. You can eventually get those frames moved to the outside of the brood chamber where they will typically be used for honey and can be removed when full and simply crushed and the honey strained, or removed when empty and the wax (and rubber bands) cut out and melted down for sale or reuse.