Bee Escapes? Make 'em!

Discussion in 'Building plans, blueprints, and finished projects' started by PerryBee, Apr 10, 2013.

  1. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Did you ever look at those triangle (Quebec) bee escapes and think,"I like those?" :thumbsup:
    Why not build your own? :dontknow:
    To get up to speed, check out the thread on building your own inner covers.
    Once finished just pick it up here:

    Bee Escapes 001.jpg Bee Escapes 003.jpg

    To this point, the only difference between a triangle bee escape and an inner cover is the depth of the wood to build the rim.With a bee escape you want to use wood that is 1 1/4" thick (and use plywood that is 1/4" thick as well). Once you are to this point you should have something like this with a 1/2" lip all the way around on both sides.

    Bee Escapes 004.jpg

    Next, you need some stock that is 3/8" by 5/8".
    Bee Escapes 013.jpg Bee Escapes 012.jpg

    Cut your self two sizes of pieces.
    The first being 8" on the long side and 6" long on the short side.
    The second being 12 1/2" on the long side and 10" on the short side.

    Bee Escapes 006.jpg

    You will need 3 of each, for each escape you want to build.
    Lay them into position, glue and then brad/nail/staple (what ever tickles your fancy) into place.
    Bee Escapes 008.jpg Bee Escapes 009.jpg
    Next, get some #8 hardware cloth, cut a triangular piece to cover the strips of wood on the escape board, and staple it into place.

    Bee Escapes 010.jpg
    That's it! You're done!
    Easy wasn't it?
    (These sell for between $13 and $15 up here)
     
  2. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

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    Great! more wood to cut! Thanks Perry!:thumbsup:
     

  3. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    I'm going to show this to my dad. he's the woodworker. great idea. :)
     
  4. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

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    what size gap should there be between the corners of the triangles?
     
  5. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Enough to let a drone through (just in case one finds its way up into the honey supers).
     
  6. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    PerryBee; the dimensions given will result in different angles on the ends of the short pieces than the long ones, would it not? I can't tell from the picture if the long ones were actually made a sharper angle.

    "The first being 8" on the long side and 6" long on the short side.
    The second being 12 1/2" on the long side and 10" on the short side."
     
  7. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    To be truthful, I don't know what the angles are. :dance::oops:
    I just used the lengths off of a store bought one, and they seem to work OK for me. If there is any discrepancy one could always adjust the angle to suit I suppose.
    A finish carpenter I am not, more of a bumbler at best, having been fortunate to this point in that I still have all my fingers. :lol:
     
  8. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

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    another probably obvious question. Do you place the escape side of the board toward the hive body or toward the supers?
     
  9. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    The board is placed under the super you want to empty of bees, the hole facing up and the screen and the escape slots underneath---allowing the bees to go down and not find their way back up.
    They are great and effective.:thumbsup:
     
  10. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    A Slight Variation

    Starting with a flat board and double sided rim, now cut two round holes in opposite corners of the board. On the underside of the board, attach 2 pieces of 3/8 square timber so that each piece is at 90 degrees to the rim with the hole in the centre of the enclosed space. Leave a bee/drone gap were the 3/8 's pieces would meet. Cover the space enclosed by the 3/8 pieces with fine mesh.

    The bees in the super go down through the round holes. From that space the exit to the hive is via the gap between the pieces of 3/8. The small gap acts as a one-way exit.

    I know....I know !!!! A photo would be better but technical difficulties. :smile:
     
  11. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    I read on "that other forum" of the hazards of leaving an escape on too long. Seems the hive beatles (if you have them) go crazy in the abandoned hives.
     
  12. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    I built some very similar ones last year. On mine the gaps on the inside row of sticks are offset, making return traffic even less likely. these work very well. The escape board need only stay on for a day or less. the first time I tried this I put it on in the morning and by late afternoon there were only about 30 bees left in the super.
     
  13. Daniel Y

    Daniel Y New Member

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    Thanks, This is the first time I have actually seen how a bee escape is designed. I will say it has given me a lot of fuel for thought.

    As for the angles on the ends of each side. they would be 60 degrees. size of triangle is determined by the lengths of the sides not by the angles.
     
  14. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    PerryBee, I cut out a set of pieces yesterday just to see the effect of the measurements I questioned. I think I see the reason for the measurements you quoted. The inner short pieces create a parallel slot escaping from the tips of the triangle and the more sharply tapered ends of the outer triangle create a funneled exit at the tips. Probably not that critical but it looks like form follows function! I had a thought that the screened triangle assembly might be made quickly removeable or attachable so that it would work on any inner cover with a central hole. Any how, thanks for sharing!
     
  15. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    The bee escape board is typically made fairly thick (1 to 1.5" deep on the bottom side), so that all those bees have a place to go.
     
  16. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    Yes they do beard up when you take supers off. I have a bunch of 1 1/2 shims (2x2 stock) that I use when putting formic acid strips on and for space when putting sugar etc., up top.
     
  17. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    DSC00134.jpg DSC00133.jpg

    A couple of pics to go with my post of April 15th. Hope they help.
     
  18. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    A picture is worth a thousand words. Now I understand what you described. :grin:
     
  19. litefoot

    litefoot New Member

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    Using a bit of trig and assuming that the longer pieces do have less of an angle than the shorter ones, then the angle of the shorter pieces would be 32 degrees and 39.8 degrees for the long pieces. Again, that's assuming the stock in .625" laying flat and there is a 1" and 3/4" difference on each end respectively for the short and long pieces.
     
  20. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    Perry,

    When next you make some, try a single triangle or even a rectangle with bee exits on two opposite corners. They seem to work. :smile: