Bee Property

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by crazy8days, Jan 21, 2013.

  1. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

    Messages:
    711
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    How does one go by finding property to house their bees? I will expand this year but, running out of room where I have my hives. What can I do to find other property? Thanks
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    If I see a spot that I think might be good, I just drive up the nearest driveway and ask. :thumbsup: Worst they can say is no, and if you explain the honey deal before they do it often "sweetens" the deal. :wink:
     

  3. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

    Messages:
    711
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    What would be a honey deal?
     
  4. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

    Messages:
    2,060
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Give honey gift in exchange for allowing the bees there. I use to award 2 lb per hive. I don't know what the going rate is now?
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    most of the sites I have obtained are either by word of month or someone who buys my honey at the farmer's market and ask me if I ever place hives on property. at that point I ask a few critical question to see if 'the site' passes on certain fundamentals <generally a secure spot that get little or no human traffic and a good ALL YEAR water source. I provide some small quantity of honey for rent... which I qualify as being available in most years but if the bees produce none then the land owner also gets none <in 2011 I was very thankful I had added this qualification to my agreement. if you have a farm coop or feed store you might also post a flyer on their advertisement board.

    ps.... in the expansion phase of growing out a beekeeping operation a location a couple of miles away to set down newly made up nucs and/or to set down extra hives is extremely handy if not essential.
     
  6. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

    Messages:
    711
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    why is that?
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    well it allows you a location for setting down splits away from your main yard but not so far as to require a lot of fuel expense or time. I have one location down the road that I use for a temporary site for locating new hives when I get a few too many here at the house. These new hives typically require a bit of constant attention (and often times just a bit of feed) so a lot of time and money is not wasted just getting from here to there. If you get to the point of making up queen cells these kinds of places are good breeding purposes by situating 'drone mother' hives at the edges of the yard.
     
  8. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

    Messages:
    5,162
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    run an add in the news paper and/or craigs list, talk to your ag extension agent (I know we even have a pollinators form we can fill out to be put on a list), ask at your local beekeepers club meeting, bulletin board at the co-op, tractor supply, farm store.
     
  9. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

    Messages:
    469
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I seem to remember 10% of honey produced as the usual "rent". I thing I want an out yard this year too. My backyard is across the lane to a playground and sooner or later somebody is going to complain.

    At 2 miles the field bees from the splits will not return to their original hive location, making it easier to have a well balanced population in the split.
     
  10. bamabww

    bamabww Active Member

    Messages:
    1,021
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    I've had people to just volunteer spots for hives on their property. Especially so when they have an orchard. I haven't had a need to do so yet but who knows?
     
  11. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    a pistolpete snip..
    I seem to remember 10% of honey produced as the usual "rent".

    tecumseh...
    some folks are much more liberal than myself when it comes to the rent..... or perhaps I have seen too much honey stacked up in garages setting there, collecting dust but definitely not being used. after a while you learn which folks use honey and which do not. when I have done a bit of early extracting I take a few jars by those folks who do regularly use the stuff and tell them when they run out to give me a ring. no matter what you policy I would limit any honey as rent for those years when you do capture a crop.... this simply allows you to not need to buy honey if you have a severe drought or disease or pesticide problem.
     
  12. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I agree with tecumseh. You will know who is using it and who doesn't. My yards are small (compared to most) one 6 to 8 hives. Each property owner gets 2 - 1 kilo jars and if they require more to let me know if and when they need it.
     
  13. pturley

    pturley New Member

    Messages:
    419
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I've lucked out with family ties. This past holidays, I've had two of my wife's family members offer their properties as possible beeyards.

    One couple (Mike and Lisa) live 10 minutes away and has about 5 acres of open, standing trees, very close to a large metropark.
    The back of his property opens up into small clearings and would be a good location for a handful of hives. The only issue I have is that there are farmed fields behind his property. You never know what they might spray. I'd need to contact the farmer for the adjoining fields to see what is planned for this year.

    Mark and Kathy live on a large parcel including several acres of standing trees, just on the edge of town (literally along the city limits) only a short distance away (3 miles, if that far!). There are neighborhoods of newer houses surrounding the property.

    Cool thing is, but he and his wife are interested in learning to be beekeepers as well. This may mean that it might not be long before they have their hives on the property (perhaps not even a long term site for mine), but it'll be good all around.
     
  14. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

    Messages:
    2,060
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    if you place in orchards beware of sprays and educate the orchardest on spraying around bees.
     
  15. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

    Messages:
    1,252
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    I have been lucky with out yards, tons of people have offered up acres for bee yards and miles apart from each other, offering the honey is the best bet too.
     
  16. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

    Messages:
    711
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I put an ad on Craigslist. Had a gentleman 5 miles from my hives asked to have bee on his 5 acres. He said he has a very large garden and when his neighbor had bees the garden did much better. I Google map he property and it seems like a promising place. Looks like a couple ponds with a 1/4 of a mile and he has several birdbaths. Here is the property if this works. http://maps.google.com/
     
  17. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

    Messages:
    711
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    well, map didn't go his his place. Not sure he would want me to give out his address. Sorry
     
  18. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

    Messages:
    711
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    So far I have 6 people interested. Most are around fields. no thanks. I have a gentleman that has 40 acres. Mostly woodland and open areas. I googled mapped the area and there are NO agricultural fields nearby. Do woods serve any use to the bees as much as a open area? Also, right along a river.
     
  19. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

    Messages:
    469
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Trees can be a major source of nectar, but it really depends on the type of tree. Wetlands are also good, with willows producing a large early pollen crop.
     
  20. DLMKA

    DLMKA New Member

    Messages:
    429
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I put an ad on craigslist today and already have 3 possible yards. 2 are too far away (20 miles), one is about 5 miles away which is about perfect and the area is a good mix of residential, timber, open grassland, and some agricultural land.

    Don't discount a yard because there is row crop fields in the area. Soybeans can produce a lot of nectar. I ended up with at least 4 mediums of honey last summer when the soybeans were blooming off two hives. I would prefer to have at least 1/4 mile distance between hives and fields though.