Bee Repellents post Cut Out?

Discussion in 'Swarms, Cut outs, and Trap outs' started by Woz, Mar 31, 2012.

  1. Woz

    Woz New Member

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    G'day,

    I have a situation where after, a late cutout (Australia) of a colony from an external wall, which went brilliantly, I need to locate the new hive relatively close (couple of metres) to the old entrance. It is an old building with gaps all over the place so sealing up the old position is impossible. The bees are quite settled in their new home and rarely venture back to the old entrance, usually only if I have disturbed them in some way which is an ever diminishing occurrence.

    I was thinking about putting a Bee Repellent in the old entrance to dissuade them from entering at all, I read that Orange Oil is effective, but of course I don't want them getting the idea that the whole location is no longer suitable and absconding.

    Any suggestions please.

    Thanks,
    Woz
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    They will quit going to the old location when they have the last vestige of honey cleaned out. No repellent needed. Of course, the first swarm within a kilometer will settle there if you don't either block it or fill the cavity.

    PS. Welcome. Glad to see you posting.
     

  3. Woz

    Woz New Member

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    Thanks. There is nothing left of either honey or comb, I made sure of that before boarding up the wall again. However, as I say, sealing up the myriad of gaps is impossible and would take more sealant than ...

    Hence I was thinking of a repellent to keep the old colony, and possibly any new ones, away. Perhaps I will just have to keep a watchful eye open.
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    ""There is nothing left of either honey or comb, I made sure of that before boarding up the wall again.""

    Think again. A bee can carry enough nectar in it's life time to make 1/12 teaspoon of honey. Now imagine how much it can carry in one trip. Are you sure you didn't spill even that much and leave it in the structure?

    They will find minute amounts you and I likely cannot even see, and clean up the very last micro droplets. Then they will not go back.
     
  5. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Just the smell of the old hive is still strong to a bees smeller for many years and a swarm might just move in.
     
  6. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Why should it bother you if they snoop around their old home--so long as they aren't settling there, let them be bees....curious, investigative. Their queen is in a new home and it is theirs too. In time the visits will cease. Flowers are more interesting.
     
  7. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Oh yes, Welcome to the forum, Glad to have you with us.