Bee with withered wings

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by crazy8days, Nov 18, 2012.

  1. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    I was out a few days ago to cover my hives with roofing felt. It was in the mid 50's and bees were out. Saw 1 bee not moving but still alive. His wings looked withered or maybe worn out. Did not see any other bees like this one. Think this is an old bee or what? Did find it interesting that there were bees bringing pollen in. I figured there would be no pollen to collect.
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    This is where a picture would be worth a thousand words. It could be a tired worn out worker, or it could be DWV. Were the wings deformed or did they look normal, except tattered?
     

  3. crazy8days

    crazy8days New Member

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    I wish I did have my camera. The bee was a little thin. Was on the side of the brood box not moving around. I've have seen my bees hanging around on the boxes not moving around before. Bees looked healthy. Looked like they were basking in the sun. I have seen with both hives dead females at the entrance. One day it was cold and had rained. Puddles of water at the entrance and there were a couple dead. I have the hives tilted forward. Rain was very light so I'm thinking the water was able to collect. Seen some the day I found this bee. I did see them fight one bee so I assume there are some trying to rob? These are Italians and what I have read they are a breed that robs the most.
     
  4. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    If the wings were not deformed, my guess is that is a simple case of it being a tired, worn out, old bee. :cry:
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I think???? Perry is kind of trying to get you to distinguish between K wing virus and simply an old bee. K wing is a bit like it sounds with the wings appearing to be very small and deformed and kind of looking like the letter K. these kind of bees don't live so long so this always appears on younger 'fuzzy' bees. older bees will show their age in a couple of ways... first their wings will begin to look somewhat frayed along the back edges of the wing and the abdomen of the bee will look slick and very black <essentially the older bees have lost the hairs that made them appear 'fuzzy' when they were young.
     
  6. afterburn001

    afterburn001 New Member

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    Here is an example of a bee that been around the block a few times. (pun?) I have noticed that the wings start to get ragged/weathered at the tip first then damaged works it's way around the edge. The wing damage in this shot is actually mild. I'm always amazed at the amount of wing damage there can be and they still fly.

    ragged wing_small.jpg
     
  7. Tiwilager

    Tiwilager New Member

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    Not on topic...but that is a gorgeous picture.
     
  8. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I noted the gender "he" in the original post. My ladies seem to have kicked out some drones during our short bout of freezing weather. Relevant?
     
  9. melrose

    melrose New Member

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    Doesn't a mite problem cause deformed wings?
     
  10. Tiwilager

    Tiwilager New Member

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    Yes, mites transmit the deformed wing virus, but I think what everybody is trying to figure out is whether the wings were just tattered (no problem at all, just wear and tear), or whether the wings were actually deformed.
     
  11. LongWoods

    LongWoods New Member

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    I was taught to pick up the bee and drop it in a sample bag, noting where (in front of what hives) it was found and then examine it under a microscope (dissecting). It is very interesting but does not tell you for sure that a specific hive has a problem. DWV and K-Wing found inside a hive or bottom board is more telling.

    Have your Varroa counts indicated any pending problem? With this years strange weather I have noted some fairly fast Varroa spikes (counts) and now that it is cool there are very few methods remaining to effectively control the mites.

    Have you performed any Tracheal mite sampling or noted many bees on frames with K-Wing? Personally, I have not noted any unusual amount of T-mites here.