Beebuzz

Discussion in 'Bee News' started by Iddee, Jan 5, 2012.

  1. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I don't know about anyone else, but when I click on the link I get a"sign in to Windows live" page? :confused:
     

  3. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    OK. I edited it. Try it now.
     
  5. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Good read, scary too! :(
     
  6. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    Worked that time.
    Thanks Iddee.
    This really is some scary stuff. Question is, which of our elected reps do we contact?
     
  7. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Don't know about elected reps. Most are useless, and the rest are worse.

    You could always ask Kim Flottom to post on a few forums, """like this one!""" :thumbsup:
    The media is the way to get anything done.
     
  8. Hog Wild

    Hog Wild New Member

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    Has anyone experienced issues such as these when planting gardens with coated seed? I am looking at planting about 1/4 acre this year within eye shot of 6 hives.

    I am getting conflicting growth patterns based upon organic versus coated seed. Any advice would be appreciated.

    Thanks!
     
  9. Indiana Dave

    Indiana Dave New Member

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    :yahoo: Yippee!!!! I have cornfields alternating directly north and south of me every year. :evil:
    Hope to avoid this again this year.
     
  10. sqkcrk

    sqkcrk New Member

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    My understanding is that the problem comes from dust in the atmosphere during planting of fields of corn and soy beans, primarily. There shouldn't be much dust release when you plant seeds by hand in a family garden. This is a by product of modern agricutural practices. Specifically the coated seed and the machinery used to plant it.

    The above is not a negative commentery on modern ag practices.
     
  11. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    Here goes. From my creaky memory I recall that French and German beeks lost bees/hives (?) from seed dressings. Apparently the dressing was released from the seed into the air because of either faulty adhesion or machinery. This occurred a few years ago. As a follow-up a report was published about 'gutation'. Under certain weather conditions the corn plants exude fluid. The systemic seed dressing was detected in this gutation fluid.
     
  12. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Here's my two cents worth. I've been planting treated sweet corn seed within 10ft. to 300ft. of my hives for 30 yrs. The bees are all over the tossels for pollen every year and i've not had a problem. During the growing season there are many weeds that bloom in the rows that the cultivater doesn't get and the bees work (dead nettle, henbit, dandelions,ect.) and again no problems? I plant with a 2 row corn planter, 3 acres of sweet corn for farmers market. Is this the type of seed we are talking about or the treated genetic altered seed that kills the corn worm :confused: Jack
     
  13. Hog Wild

    Hog Wild New Member

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    Jack, I am looking at doing the same type sweet & ambrosia corn for local sale along with a variety of other vegetables. This will be my first year back with corn other than a few years back before I started keeping bee's.

    Did not want to risk my bee's health plus I can't keep enough cabbage collards; already figured if feedback was negative it would sway me to plant more collards versus corn. Reckon I'll have to increase the garden size-the customer is always right! Most of the time.....

    Thanks everyone for the feedback!
     
  14. Indiana Dave

    Indiana Dave New Member

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    That's a relief! :oops:
     
  15. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    nice catch..

    an article snip...
    Maize seeds are typically planted at a rate of about 12,500 kernels/hectare (30,875 kernels/acre). The latest research was begun after reports of bee kills at Indiana apiaries in the spring of 2010 that coincided with the peak period of maize planting in the area. Analyses of these bees and pollen from the hives revealed that both clothianidin and thiamethoxam were present on dead bees and in pollen collected from a single hive. The compounds were also present in dead bees from other hives but not in bees from hives that did not show mortality. Also found was atrazine, a herbicide that is commonly used in maize production and is relatively non-toxic to honey bees.

    tecumseh:
    please correct me if I am wrong but I think someone got the hectares and acres confused. I think it should be 12000 plants/acre and 30000 plants/hectare.

    what the article does not suggest is the lethal effects of these compounds (insecticides, fungicides and herbicides) combined with bee keeper applied miticides. at least a bit of science is highly suggesting that 'bee keepers' don't get a free pass here either.
     
  16. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Hog wild, Ambrosia is the only corn seed i plant, i have tried other variety of corn, but my customers demand that i stick to Ambrosia. I use Asana insecticide for corn worms ( resticted, you have to have a license) and spray the silks only twice (4 days apart when the silks start) and spray early mourning or late in the evening with no bee kill. :thumbsup: ( bees don't work the silks). I'm sure Asana would kill bees, but i've not had a problem with it, you can spray the corn one day and eat it the next, but it is usually 5 days after the last spray before it matures. It is restricted because if it gets into the streams it will kill fish. I don't like using chemicals or insecticides, but you can't sell produce that the varmits get the best of :roll: When using insecticedes read the lable and act accordingly is the best advice i can give, and there are other insecticides that work just as good. This probably won't set to well with the organic people. Jack
     
  17. Hog Wild

    Hog Wild New Member

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    Thanks for the info. Jack. I will look into the Asana, is there an equivalent insecticide that you do not have to be licensed to purchase?

    Are you purchasing your seed on line or buying it local? Our local retailers are very proud of their seed in these parts! Dave
     
  18. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    I would check with your local Extension office on comparable insecticides, I'm having trouble getting Asana. The last i bought was $125.00 a gal. MFA Feed co. can get it but they have to buy a case (12 to a case) and i'm the only one who calls for it, and a gal will last me 4 yrs. I've been buying my seed local (150 miles NE. of me) from Morgan County Seed, Barnett, Mo. Phone#573-378-2655 an Amish community. The price this year for Ambrosia is $11.20 per # if you buy 5-24 pounds. The Bodacious corn is the same as Ambrosia but is solid yellow $10.60 per 5-24 pound. I can take my 8x10ft. trailer full to the farmers market and sell out in 30 min. at $5.00 per doz. but with fighting cost,labor, insects, coons, and deer, and keeping the bees safe, you'll earn every penny of it.But i'm a farmer. :mrgreen: Jack
     
  19. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    I can't help but think that if the toxins are in the pollen, and are being taken up through the roots... isn't the toxin also in the corn we eat and/or feed to livestock?
     
  20. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Hobie,i can't answer your question? but with the corn seed being hard and coated with the toxin? i wonder how much it could absorb into the seed.Also rain would wash some of it off, but would be in the soil, would the roots absorb the toxin and be enough to be harmful? I don't like using chemicals on anything, but with all the old and new diseases and new insects being introduced into the US of A it's becoming a must if you are producing larg quanities of food products. (farming) When i was growing up everyone had a garden (or you starved) if a family had a sickness neighbors would share what they had to help them survive, and we didn't use chemicals,probably couldn't afford them anyway, if we had potato bugs we picked them off by hand and tomato worms ect. We are losing our farmers and farm land and it's sad to say, but without the chemicals things would be alot worse. :shock: Did i say that. Jack