Beekeeper w/horsemanure in smoker--0// Bees--1

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by LtlWilli, Oct 29, 2008.

  1. LtlWilli

    LtlWilli New Member

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    I thought that today's pull was gonna be a breeze. The horse droppings were super dry, lit up easily, and created a forrest fire of smoke. With great confidence, we approached the target, I climbed the little ladder, and went at it....OK---here they come, so let 'em have it!!!!Ummmmm---I got the same reaction as if i'd blown T-bone steak smoke into a field hand's nostrils. They seemed to love it! It got so bad, that an orderly retreat was called for....We came away with only 5 frames. At least they were all solid honey on both sides.
    I know that cow droppings work, so why not horse? I am definitly confused. I just think it's not my day. ;)

    So, what is the best smoker fuel all around???
     
  2. CountryBoy

    CountryBoy New Member

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    I have tried everything and the best results I have is with plain dry pinestraw. Puff your smoker gently and make sure the smoke is cool and thick. It calms the Bees down and you can work them easily.
     

  3. LtlWilli

    LtlWilli New Member

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    Hey, thanks CountryBoy!.I appreciate that....Oh, and WELCOME to the site! Always glad to have someone new to step in here. We're as laid back as a guy can be, and still have a pulse. :lol: :lol: :lol:
     
  4. Charles

    Charles New Member

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    I'm suprised the horse manure didn't work, whater you feedin them ponies! :lol:
     
  5. LtlWilli

    LtlWilli New Member

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    They are getting some pretty good eats right now, as no freeze has knocked down the World Feeder Bermuda. The droppings were perfect, I'd say. Do you think maybe cow would be better becuase they tend to hold moisture and burn wetter?----Like a heavier smoke?
    Oh!!!...a breakthrough yesterday. I was ordering plastic jars from Dadant, and my wife stopped by, wanting me to buy the beginners book for her. Halleluja!....she's hooked now! I am most happy to have her pitching in with interest. She's been my main squeeze for 35 years, and now I think I'll keep her 35 more. :p
     
  6. 1of6

    1of6 New Member

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    Any wife that has enough patience to put up with a hubby using manure in a smoker is a keeper. :D

    I wonder if this is just a rough time for taking anything off the stack...something tells me your choice of fuel was not the cause of the cold reception - but probably just a product of the bees temperment change in late fall.

    I really like 100% cotton jeans, old jeans or even ones that you get dirt cheap from a thrift store. It's a dry cool smoke that seems more soothing to the bees than some of the other things I've tried. A lot of folks really do swear by their pine products too, so you might experiment with that as well. I've throw a handful of green grass on top of the burning fuel as well, but this makes the smoke moist, and really saps up the smoker too. To each his own.

    Do the stings this time of year feel any different to you? They seem to burn a little more, or at least that's my opinion for this year.

    Good thread - I like to hear the reults of folks trying new things.
     
  7. LtlWilli

    LtlWilli New Member

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    Hmmmm.....Cloth! I didn't think of that.---good suggestion.
    Yes, now that you mention it , they do have more zing to the sting, but it does not last as long or swell so much. Another point is the difference between the types of bee. I have two Russian hives that produce like sweethearts, but their sting is like a hornet. I'd rather take two Italian stings than one of theirs. Luckily, they are very, very mild, and hard to rile up. I am most thankful for that.
     
  8. busybee

    busybee New Member

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    I know a beekeeper who uses burlap. Works great to calm the bees and smells good too. (hemp) :mrgreen:
     
  9. dogsoldier13

    dogsoldier13 New Member

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    i just cant help imagining beekeepers sitting around smoking burlap! :roll: