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welcome to the forum
the best recommendation for reading you just found. Its right here on the forum you wont find a nicer knowlegeable diverse group of keeps willing to share what they know. The best book I would recommend is the abc's & xyz's of beekeeping. hope to see you around and good luck as you begin what is hoped a lifelong hobby of beekeeping. :thumbsup:
 

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Welcome J.E. :hi:

I've got an old ABC-XYZ that is good (a little dated) Believe it or not, Beekeeping for Dummies has some good basic information.
Like the Rat says, just pour over a lot of the information available right here. Don't be afraid to ask questions, everyone here started at some point (well, except maybe Iddee or tecumseh) they was born with a smoker in their hands). You will find that questions get answered in a timely fashion here and you won't find a friendlier place! :thumbsup:
 

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Welcome, Jenna! All of the books mentioned are pretty good and very helpful. I hope you enjoy the forum, too!
 

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If you can read Civil War era flowery English, my favorite edition of Langstroth's, A Practical Treatise on the Hive and the Honey Bee, is the 3rd edition, printed from the late 1850's to the early 1880's by various printers. It is available as a FREE download from Google Books. I am constantly re-reading portions of this book. It really is a practical treatise on what the bees do and why and what the beekeeper should do. I read it in its entirety the first summer I had bees and again the second summer. I could tell that the bees had taught me a lot that first year and the book made much more sense on that second reading.

If you go to Google, click on "more," click on "books," do the advanced search and click the "full view" selections, you will have access to the hundreds of thousands of out of print books they have scanned and have made available for free. I download them in pdf to my computer when I find historic books I am interested in. I used to strain and read for short periods on the computer, but I got the bottom of the line Kindle for reading these books and I love it. I also have a copy of North American Honey Plants that I have downloaded.

If you choose to try this, good hunting to you!
 

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I have the book that Riverrat and Perrybee have. I found it in an antique store. :D The book is dated 1919 but I believe it was actually written sometime before that. :confused: It is filled with very helpful info, but I have to admit, alot of my questions have been answered right here. If I need to know something, I use the search first and many times have found several threads on the subject.
:drinks:
 

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For someone w/ a TBH looking for something more contemporary there is "The Practical Beekeeper" by Michael Bush, which is actually online free at www.bushfarms.com and then there is "The Complete Idiot's Guide to Beekeeping" by Dean Stiglitz and Laurie Herboldsheimer.

Another book I liked the first time it came out, whose name I don't recall right now, is by Alphonse Avitable and Diana Sommetaro. "The Beekeeper's Handbook" perhaps? I'm sure someone else knows that one. The Authors have put out an updated issue.

There are as many Bee Books as there are Gardening Books or Cook Books, maybe more, I have well over 60 myself, not that I have read very many of them. Depending on what kind of beekeeper you want to be, the basics may be basic, but there are books especially suited for the "traditional" and the "modern/progressive/natural" or whatever.

Don't box yourself in. It's a smorgasboard. Pick and choose.
 

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sqkcrk said:
For someone w/ a TBH looking for something more contemporary there is "The Practical Beekeeper" by Michael Bush, which is actually online free at http://www.bushfarms.com and then there is "The Complete Idiot's Guide to Beekeeping" by Dean Stiglitz and Laurie Herboldsheimer.
I second these two sources as well, especially for a new hobby person with a top bar hive.
 

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although not particularly directed towards beginning bee keepers anything by Richard Taylor (now deceased) is a great read. I think the title I have of his is The Joy of Beekeeping.
 
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