been a little slow in beekeeping 101 lets fix this

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by riverrat, Jul 28, 2013.

  1. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    With the season in the 7th inning stretch and the bees setting in a dearth its slowed down for the newbies and old keeps alike. Nows its time to review the games first 7 innings and what we learned.

    I will start off. I learned life without bees. I sold the operation since I had a buyer willing to buy and take all equipment and hives to run 150 hives as a package deal. I did this with the plan of starting back this next spring with a couple hives. This time keeping it a HOBBY (we all know the bee addiction we have) Anyhow I should have kept a couple hives but the break was good and much needed but I sure cant wait until next spring to dive back in. After 10 years with the bees its been like someone cut off my left arm. Anyhow what have you all learned this season.:grin:
     
  2. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood New Member

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    Timing is everything. So true in many aspects of life, but definitely true in beekeeping.
     

  3. Daniel Y

    Daniel Y New Member

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    I learned that your first year does nothing to prepair you for your second. I also learned I should have paid far more attention to Queen managment and preservation. loose a quen to swarming and it is a real PITA to get her replaced. I am now going into my 4th month trying to get some of them replaced. You don't don't do swarm prevention to save swarms you prevent them to save queens.

    I will say that 2013 has been the year of Queens for me. Not only learning more about what I need to know about them but also preparing to take the correct actions next year. April and May was abotu increasing hives which went fairly well althign it was a sink or swim type situation all the way.
     
  4. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    That it is safer to make candles from the wax and eat the honey from an almost dead hive than to feed it to the bees. I gave the rest of my hives EFB with hive 1's honey... if they didn't already have it from bee tree comb.
    I also learned 2 hives are relaxing, 5 last year, plus nucs, weren't, and the great dying disaster wasn't much fun.
     
  5. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    At my age i'm to dumb to learn much of anything:???:,i just wait till something happens and try to fix it:eek:. That's one reason i'm on this friendly forum.:lol: Jack
     
  6. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I learned you cannot retire from removals when everyone in the state knows you. The calls just keep coming in.
     
  7. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Grow slow! :wink:
     
  8. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    1. Weather has tremendous effects on bees.

    2. Appreciate your health. Work carefully. You only have one back, protect it.

    I'm sure there will be more ideas as I think about it.
     
  9. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    When dealing with bees, expect the unexpected. :???:
     
  10. ndm678

    ndm678 Member

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    1. Starting a package with drawn comb is a HUGE benefit, be ready for expansion very quickly
    2. Give replacement / caged queens a little longer to be accepted, tape the candy plug for a few days.
    3. Keep hive sizes the same. It's disheartening to see a hive that needs to expand, and all u have is a medium box and 10 deep frames.
    4. Listen to the folks on beekeepingforums.com. It will save you a lot of headaches.
    5. Community feeding is a bad idea, DON'T DO IT!
     
  11. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Good post ndm678,Looks like you've been to the same school many of us here on the BeeKeeping Forume. The School of Hard Knocks.:thumbsup: Jack
     
  12. Whisky Fish

    Whisky Fish New Member

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    I learned that I can stump around a bunch of web sites and find out nothing, or I can show up here and open up just about any old thread and learn something nearly every time. I also learned there is no substitute for just jumping in with both feet and roll with the bees! Thanx for all the info you folks share so generously.
     
  13. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    I agree with Daniel. The 2nd year was nothing like the first.

    My list is long. But the top few are.

    1. This forum is invaluable.
    2. I learned the true value of PULLED comb.
    3. You have to learn to anticipate and not react.
    4. I never realized how good Honey is.:grin:
     
  14. Ray

    Ray Member

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    Beekeeping is easy: all you have to do is:
    1) outsmart 50,000 insects and fool them into doing what you want them to.
    2) know the precise dates of all major flows and dearths.
    3) understand the weather and its effect on the above.