Bees and baseball + ignorant beekeeper

Discussion in 'Bee News' started by Iddee, Jul 3, 2009.

  1. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
  2. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

    Messages:
    1,696
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I hardly think they were going to stop the game and wait for a beekeeper to hive the swarm. Sometimes you do what you need to do. I didn't see much wrong with what happened.

    Lets see....hold up the game for another hour, delay the broadcast, keep tens of thousand of fans waiting to resume the game....for 70 dollars worth of bees. Like that was going to happen. NOT!

    The guy was probably paid to get rid of the problem, or was on staff to handle such things. He may not of even been a beekeeper. But if he was, I bet it still would of been handled the same way.

    What's next....

    Air traffic control.... "Ohara is now closed! We are sorry for the inconvenience, but we have a honey bee swarm on the runway and we are waiting for a local beekeeper to show up and box the bees".

    Head Security Dude.... "Why don't we have the airport firemen hose down the swarm with foam like we did the last time?"

    Air traffic control....We can't kill those bees. Didn't you hear, the worlds food production is dependant on those bees. Besides, my kids love that bee movie" (He now starts humming "Here comes the sun, little darling, here comes the sun......")

    Head security dude...."Yeah, your right. We can reroute the several hundred thousand passengers onto other planes later. And although this will cost us our jobs and the airport millions of dollars, the bees must be saved!"

    ;)
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    How about just dropping the swarm in a box, close the lid, and spray the 50 or so bees left, thus saving the hive?

    Why go to the extreme either way?

    Common sense just doesn't seem to be too common any more.
     
  4. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

    Messages:
    1,696
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I'm guessing there was no swarm box. And I hardly think they were going to wait around for the local bee club to be contacted, a swarm list to be called to see who was available, or for some delay in waiting for the beekeeper to show up. We see beloved bees worth saving. The people, including television executives, club owners, etc., at the ballpark are protecting millions of dollars of investment, safety for fans, and liability issues.

    I'm guessing at the first chance of acquiring a suit, perhaps from a fan with a beesuit in the car, and was handed a couple cans of spray, that the bees were dealth with. No mention of a swarm box.

    But I'm sure it was not going to go like this.....

    Television or club owner.... "So what's happening on this bee situation? This delay is costing us dearly"

    Head ground crew guy....."Well, we have a bee suit, and a couple cans of bee kill, but were waiting back to hear if George (guy from public relations) got ahold of anyone from the bee club over in San Diego. We wanted to see if anyone was willing to show up and capture the swarm. It would be a shame to kill them. You don't mind do you? Besides, the only guy willing to go out there, besides the unliscensed and uninsured beekeeper (who can not be allowed on the feild) is Ted, and he has no clue what to do other than just spray the whole cluster and kill them. No common sense in that.

    Of course there are things we do not know. Was the guy a beekeeper or the only grounds crew guy willing to put on the suit. Was there a swarm box? (Yes, I suppose a handy cardboard box could of been used) Was there a discussion that we are not privy regarding saving them, but some executive made the decision to handle the situation the way it was?

    I'm sure PETA will be boycotting the next game, setting up picket lines, and expect the next time, that regardless of cost, regardless of human safety, and regardless of even if the game needed to be suspended, that all and any means possible should of been used.

    I for one, will not be sending a check to PETA, supporting such drastic expectations. Common sense to me is the realization that every swarm can not, and will not be saved. And that sitting here, making comments and judements about others is about as bad as PETA themselves.

    A swarm showed up at a ballpark in the middle of a game, and they were disposed of. No big deal. And when we as beekeepers make a bigger deal out of it, and even suggest that "extreme" measures were taken, then we might as well be handing out membership forms to PETA. I'll pass.
     
  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
  6. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

    Messages:
    1,322
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Frankly running around the baseball field with a can of raid, chasing down a absconding swarm of bees, that otherwise are in a fairly good mood, doesn't impress me as the most clever idea :roll: , if your going to destroy them, have a bit of intellect, wait until they cluster. Frankly I could care less what PETA says :shock: . MOST people realize that they are extremeists and treat their leadership accordingly. Of course if they do cluster then simplifies the capturing of them, assuming the cluster is a bit lower then the light standards
     
  7. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

    Messages:
    2,683
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    if they was clustered in the time it took hime to spray and remove them he could have hived them in a card board box from the concession stand quicker than the 52 minutes they said it took
     
  8. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

    Messages:
    1,696
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Assuming he was a beekeeper....... :lol: