Bees and my Tulip Poplar and Catawba tree disapointment

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by bamabww, May 12, 2011.

  1. bamabww

    bamabww New Member

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    My Tulip Poplar is just a few days past full bloom and I never saw a honeybee on it.

    My Catawba tree is just now starting to bloom and I haven't seen a honeybee even approach it.

    The bumble bees have covered them up though.

    I'll admit that surprised me about the honeybees but the hive is very active and the majority of the pollen coming back to the hive is yellow. My honey super has 6 full frames I'm guessing primarily from the 6 or 7 acres of yellow clover plus a variety of wild flowers etc.

    As a new beekeeper I know I have lots to learn but this lesson really surprised me. I guess it's like when momma cooked broccoli for supper. I could eat it but there were always other things on the table I'd eat first.
     
  2. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Yep once they home in on a bloom they will most times not turn away from it.
     

  3. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

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    Don'tcha just hate it when they do what they want instead of what you want?

    They'll go for the source they like best, even if it's not the source you like best. Oh well, there's always next year, right?
     
  4. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Sounds like you need more hives in the area so there is more competition, forcing the bees to work every bloom instead of what they want.
     
  5. bamabww

    bamabww New Member

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    Never thought of that! I purposely moved my hives away from each other a couple of hundred yards to keep them from competing. Thanks for that advice.
     
  6. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    I hear ya! My apple tree is full of bumble bees, carpenter bees, sweat bees, wasps, and everything else, but nary a honeybee in the apple tree. Apparently something even better (in the honeybees' opinion) blooms at the same time.
     
  7. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    bama a 100 yards is not far enough away from each other to make a difference, maybe a mile.
     
  8. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

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    A few hundred yards won't make a difference as far as bloom competition goes... it will help reduce drift though, which might slow the spread of diseases through your apiary though.

    Since their normal forage radius is three miles, you'd have to move them at least 6 miles apart to avoid bloom competition, but bloom competition isn't necessarily all that bad, most areas can easily accomodate a couple dozen hives, so bloom competition shouldn't be a large concern. Also, the longer the bees are in the area, and the more bees that are there, the better the area becomes for bees as the plants that require bee pollination, which are also the same ones that are good for the bees, can compete and even out-compete against the wind-pollinated plants as more seeds get created by the bee-friendly plants as a result of the presence of the bees, and in years down the line, more of those plants grow in the area as a result.