bees are bothering my neighbors...

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by dominica, Jul 28, 2010.

  1. dominica

    dominica New Member

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    i have a hive in the backyard that looks healthy, i have added a 2nd hive body because the first one was completely drawn out....

    solved a previous problem with robbers by reducing the entrance and moving the boardman feeder about 30 yards away from the hive

    now the problem i have is that the bees are bothering my neighbors. i got an email at work yesterday that a number of bees were out just flying around and following the neighbors around buzzing them. no one is getting stung, but they follow and buzz and will even land on you. they do this to me every once in a while when i mow, but it's never been a problem.

    it's been 95 degrees with 110 heat indexes here for the past 3 weeks---it's an awful heat wave and i do notice a lot of bees hanging out outside the hive even when it gets dark...

    can anyone give me advice on how to calm them down and keep them from becoming a neighborhood nuisance? and also, is the hanging out on the front of the hive/entrance board common during really hot summer weather??
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Hanging out is called bearding and is a sign of a strong hive.

    Explain to the neighbors why you installed the reducers and tell them it is the local feral bees that aren't being fed that is bothering them. Yours are being fed and have no reason to be upset.

    It may calm them a bit, and isn't TOTALLY untrue. ;) :D
     

  3. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    You didnt say wether or not you had a fence or something to make there flight path overhead. If you put up an obstacle for them to fly over that is above head that will help. if you have the hive on the property line close to theirs they are probably just making play flights. If this is the case you will need to move the hive to a different area on your property. If they are foraging in their yard for nectar or pollen or have locked on to a water source in the neighbors yard then there really isnt a whole lot you can do at this time. But if they are buzzing the neighbors I dont think the later is the case since when they are foraging the dont have time to play tag.
     
  4. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Once I put a frame full of last year's honey out about a dozen yards from my hives to let the bees clean it out.
    Big mistake. In an hour there were FIFTY GAZILLION bees flying all over the area in a feeding frenzy. I have no doubt that many of them were not even my own bees- all the foraging bees within 3 miles of me were flying in the air around my property. Clouds of feasting bees. I put the frame away and everything went back to normal.
    What you are doing when you moved your boardman feeder to a place some distance from the hive, is you are ringing the dinner bell for every bee within 4 miles of you. Not a problem if you have no neighbors at all nearby. But apparently you do have neighbors nearby.
    If you are going to feed your bees I suggest you do not feed them in an open buffet outside the hive, and do not use a Boardman feeder, known to encourage robbing by neighboring bees. Robbing behavior becomes more aggressive as the end of Summer approaches.

    Do your bees really need to be fed at all right now? Do they not have honey and pollen stored in the hive from Spring?
    If you must feed right now, do some research and decide on which of the several different ways you can feed your bees INSIDE the hive. If you don't do something to change what's going on, you may have neighbors demanding you get rid of your bees altogether....not a pleasant outcome.
     
  5. dominica

    dominica New Member

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    great replies and thank you. i also believe that the bees that are doing the buzzing are not solely my bees. and i understand the boardman feeder logic...i am going to abandon it at this point.

    the bees have a water source 100 yards from my house...a large creek...so i doubt they are locking onto something small in the neighbors' yard.

    the reason they didn't have a store up from the spring is that they arrived on May 25 as package bees. so feeding was definitely necessary. they do have a good store now though.

    anyway, i will take your advice and ditch the boardman. should i use pollen patties, or what do you reccommend at this point? i am def. a beginner so any info is much appreciated.
     
  6. cow pollinater

    cow pollinater New Member

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    Intead of the boardman, you can take the jar out and use it over a hole in the cover. If you have a spare deep body and an inner cover with a hole in the middle of it, place the inner cover on top of the hive with the feed jar over the hole and then place the deep hive body over the inner cover and jar and then replace the cover over the top of the whole thing.... That is assuming that you need to feed and depending on what kind of nectar flow you'll have this fall you may not.
    I open feed. I'm to lazy to feed individual hives and I don't have time to feed individual hives so it's an obvious choice. :lol: When I open feed I see lots of bees that get hurt fighting to feed, get sticky from the mess, get tired, and they need to rest. They buzz around and land on you, or a branch, in the grass, etc until they're ready to go home. But they are in forage mode so they won't sting unless you make them. Put out some syrup in your feeder and invite the neighbors over to see how gentle your bees are. :thumbsup: You can stick you hand right in the middle of the bunch and not get stung unless you pinch one.
     
  7. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper New Member

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    I also say get rid of the open feeding. Isn't any reason to feed that ay unless you have more than 25 colonies and time is limited..

    [​IMG]
    These pickle jars are free from the local pizza joint just for the asking and a thank you. They make great feeders with only a couple small problems. Storage where they don't get broke, and a deep hive body to place around them while on the hive.

    :mrgreen: Al
     
  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I'm with AL.... dearth and open feeding is likely the greatest parts of the problem.

    my preferred method of feeding also looks quite a bit like AL's.
     
  9. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    A "large creek" may not be a desirable water source for them, especially if it is swift-moving. Bees seem to prefer quiet water, like puddles, or your neighbor's swimming pool.
     
  10. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

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    I would slap a robber screen on the hive... it made all the difference in the world with my bees.