Bees from Florida to Massachusetts

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by DannyKazzy, Jul 29, 2013.

  1. DannyKazzy

    DannyKazzy New Member

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    Hey there guys and gals I'm new to the forums but I got a question I got my grandpas bees cause he got sick and can't take care of them I got them here to mass about a month ago and I have one question I got 3 supers on the hie with a queen excluder between the 2nd and 3rd one and the first super is full of pollen and I got no clue what to do with that how would I prep them for the winter
     
  2. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    First of all-and most important---wishes for a speedy and complete recovery to your grandpa. Whether he chooses to return to caring for the bees or not, may he enjoy good health.
    Secondly, Welcome to the forum. :hi:We thrive on having new members. The more, the merrier.

    As to your question, A lot depends on the local conditions of winter your bees can expect to meet during the winter. As a general recommendation, you would like to have your queen and brood-nest concentrated in the bottom box with stores of pollen and honey around them to the sides and above. A large supply of pollen is a blessing, because without it the bees can't raise new brood. If the bottom box is stuffed with too much pollen I would suggest taking out a few pollen frames from the bottom center, moving the hive's brood nest into the space made there and have pollen and honey at the sides. You might be able to accomplish the same result by simply reversing the first and second hive boxes, making sure the queen is down below. You might do well by taking 2-3 frames of pollen, wrap them in a plastic bag and put them in the freezer where they can be kept till the early spring, when the colony starts to produce masses of brood for the honey season.
    It sounds like you are starting beekeeping with the equivalent of a strong second year hive, but with background knowledge of a first year beginner. You have a lot of learning to pick up so as to keep your grandfather's hive growing and producing. Try to find a local beekeeper's club that you can join or at least find another local beekeeper who can give you advice and help you along, "hands on". We in the forum will try to help you along but each one of us is best aware of the conditions of his own local weather and flowers. What is good for us may not be best for you. Local advice will be for your advantage.
    One of the first questions I would ask a local beekeeper would be about the advisability at this time of the year to make a split so that you have two hives to overwinter. There is much to be said in favor of having a minimum of two hives, so that each one can serve as a back-up for the other in case something goes wrong with one.
    All of what I've said here is really a big "bite" into beekeeping. I hope I didn't say too much and scare you off.
    Last recommendation: get a few books on the subject and do a lot of reading.:grin:
     

  3. Hawkster

    Hawkster New Member

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    I am in eastern mass and winter can be rough. Periods of intense cold interspersed with thaws. Is your brood chamber 2 mediums? If so I would add at least one more to it, personally I use 2 deeps for wintering and occasionally this is not enough and I have to feed in February.
     
  4. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Welcome aboard! :hi:
    I am not that far from you as well. I run double deeps for winter as well, and some of them have been plugging up the bottom deep with pollen. I just let them do what they think is best, they're usually right.