Bees in a wall

Discussion in 'Swarms, Cut outs, and Trap outs' started by melrose, Mar 20, 2012.

  1. melrose

    melrose New Member

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    I've advertised to collect swarms but have received two calls about bees in walls.
    Is there a way to get all the bees without taking the house apart?
    I'd think trappingt them would leave the brood, queen and drones behind.
    How would you raise a new colony with just foragers?
    If I do this, how would trap them out, screen cone over the entry point?

    Thanks all the help this site provides.
     
  2. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    When doing a trap out a bait hive is placed in front of the entrance at the base of the trap out cone. A frame of nurse bees and brood with eggs is placed into the bait hive. The eggs are needed since the bees in the bait hive will sense they are queenless and make a queen cell. The bees that exit the cone are foragers and when they leave the cone they are going to forage, they never look back and re-orient to the end of the cone. After foraging they return to the entrance of the hive, not the end of the cone. Not being able to find their way back in and wanting to dump their load of nectar, pollen, water or propolis and return to forage again they will eventually find their way into the bait hive. With the smell of brood they are now anchored to this bait hive and will return to it. Now, even if the queen were to quite laying eggs on the very day the trap cone was put in place it will still take 21 days for the new bees to emerge, so at a minimum 21 days for the trap cone (but that is too quick in most cases). With no "groceries" coming back into the hive the queen will be forced to slow or even stop laying eggs. Shortly after this the queen and what few bees remain will abscond (leave the hive), since by this time there is a new and hopefully laying queen in the bait hive the absconders will not enter into it. Once the old hive has absconded the cone can be removed, the bees in the bait hive will find what little honey is left in the wall and rob it out. The only thing left in the wall is wax honey comb. Now seal the entrance up with silicone caulk and take the bait hive back to your bee yard. Job well done!!

    Most times it will take a minimum of 30 to 45 days up to 60 days for the trap out to be a success. It just depends on how strong the colony is.
     

  3. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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  4. melrose

    melrose New Member

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    That's my big delimma, I have no brood stock to support queen rearing, would introducing a new queen work, or would they kill her?
    I wouldn't want to wait, and suffer a laying worker
     
  5. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Not sure if you could trap out the foragers on some drawn comb and then maybe introduce a queen a couple of days later. It would have to be a strong hive you were trapping out to get enough bees into the bait hive to last long enough for the queen to actually start laying and get new brood hatched off. Might work though.

    Do you have a beekeeping buddy that would sell/give you a frame of brood?

    Are you a member of a local club, if not there are some great folks that will usually help anybody out.
     
  6. melrose

    melrose New Member

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    Unfortunately don't have a club local. I'll have to reach out to some folks for some brood
     
  7. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    http://www.eshpa.org/

    here is a link to the NY state association, there is a button on the tool bar to find local clubs, might give it a shot. I google mapped your area and with all of the farm land around you there has to be some beekeepers around.
     
  8. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    same link look for folks that sell honey, they have to have some bees.
     
  9. melrose

    melrose New Member

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    Very cool, thanks
     
  10. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    If you set the trap on a warm morning, it will trap enough bees to support a store-bought queen introduced the next day. Leave her caged for 3 days, or let them remove the candy and release her. Same as installing a package. Leave the trap until it is full of bees. You should have bees emerging by that time.