Bees love camping

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by tiso_us, Jul 16, 2011.

  1. tiso_us

    tiso_us New Member

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    Well, what i had planned never works out, I posted here...

    I landed a job that took me out of state a while, when i returned this is what i found....

    I was thinking of putting some empty frames in that compartment with some kind of queen excluder.....what do you think?...




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  2. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    I would do a cut out, remove the board that is to the left of the battery and it should expose the hive. Cut the combs out and rubber band them into frames.

    Check out the "swarms, cut outs and trap outs" section of the forums for some pics of what we are talking about.

    Do you currently have bees?
     

  3. tiso_us

    tiso_us New Member

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    no, this is the first year. no hives yet.

    The rubber band is a great idea. What i was thinking was leave the bees as they are for now, but expanding in the compartment using supers or frames until spring.

    Or, perhaps removing that plate on the left side and let the bees expand using frames, by spring the queen should be laying eggs in that compartment and thus easy to extract.

    Hmmmm, a sideway super, but i guess there are so many ways to build one.
     
  4. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    For a man with no hives, you deserve plenty of credit for your "bravery" in taking those close-up shots of the hive.
    Having the hive in a camper (assuming it is still on wheels and can be moved relatively easily) should make removing all the bees relatively quick.
    After following Iddee's suggestion for making a cut out removal, place the hive you set up as close as possible to where the bees used to enter the trailer. Make sure no brood is left in the trailer. Move the trailer about 100 yards away and have it face the opposite direction. This should make it hard for the bees to find their way back to the trailer and they should all quickly relocate themselves to the hive.
    After they've moved out of the trailer (probably a matter of a few days) you should be able to remove the rest of any remaining combs and close up the access entrance.
     
  5. tiso_us

    tiso_us New Member

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    Well bees are my less bit of worries, try a swarm of hornets while cutting a tree, ouch!.

    Unfortunately, my camper is permanently fixed, but that was a nice idea you had.

    I'm not to worried at this moment, and i know they have to be moved but i must do it when my job dictates it and that would be around spring.
     
  6. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Sounds like you've turned your camper into a storage shed.
    I hope no wasps find another corner to move into. ;)
     
  7. jb63

    jb63 New Member

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