Bees sure are a tolerant bunch (sometimes).

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by pistolpete, Jun 30, 2013.

  1. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    Today was my worst fumble so far. My bees are in a small bee shed. I had a frame of brood and bees leaned against the side of the shed on top of the hive. Somehow the thing pivoted and fell on the ground 2 feet below and landed on the smoker. I had another frame in my hands, so by the time I picked them up there was a smoked sized hole melted in the brood. I was in my shorts and t-shirt, no veil. I was certain that I would pay for my clumsiness with a whole bunch of stings, but alas, not one. Not even after I stepped on a small ball of bees on the ground.

    I always thought that I got away with no protection on account of my slow and careful inspections. Today proved that perhaps it's more the fool tolerant bees I have.
     
  2. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    The stock you have are some of the mildest temperament bees that i have had the privilege to work. You can get away with making those types of mistakes and the bees are forgiving. Do you find that they produce a lot of propolis?
     

  3. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    I'm not entirely sure what a lot of propolis would be. Definitely between the boxes and around the top entrance is gummed up, but I don't feel that it's excessive.
     
  4. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    I have one that when I removed the bottom entrance block they closed the bottom entrance back down to the with of 3 frames. Last fall I had to open the top entrance 4 times. every week they would close it completely off.
     
  5. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I have one similar. The bottom corner of the frames at the entrance end yield almost a golf ball chunk of propolis per frame. It's right alongside other hives that don't do this so it can't be because of wind or anything.
     
  6. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    I hope you good people don't just throw away all that valuable propolis. Some people ask me for it, sometimes I use it myself, and I'm sure there are many firms that purchase it for use in assorted compilations after which it is sold for a good mark-up.
     
  7. lazy shooter

    lazy shooter New Member

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    Efmesch:

    For what purpose do you use the propolis? It's a curious mind thing.
     
  8. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    I personally use it like "chewing gum" when I have a sore throat. A little chunk, about the size of 1/4-1/2 a chicklet will last for hours. It doesn't taste pleasant (it's sort of peppery) but you get used to it. I find it to be soothing and helpful in overcoming the sore throat. It takes a bit of learning just how to chew it--at the beginning it tends to stick to your teeth or to crumble and you have to form it into a chewable ball that sticks together, but I find it works.
    Bee books tell of all sorts of other uses for propolis (based on its antibiotic properties) but I haven't found it to useful other than for sore throats.
    Of course, if you manage to sell it at market price, it is very good for lining the wallet or the pocket book. :lol:
     
  9. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    It is used for its antibacterial properties. it is used in ointment and is prevalent in Chinese and naturopathic medicine