bees survived inspite of me

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by jb63, Feb 15, 2013.

  1. jb63

    jb63 New Member

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    swarm overwintered 004.JPG swarm overwintered 002.JPG swarm overwintered 005.JPG swarm overwintered 001.JPG swarm overwintered 003.JPG It warmed up today and I was curious what was going on in this one.When I opened the lid I was surprised how I left it. The pics aren't in order so what I saw was #4,six frames and a feeder.The catch is only the middle 3 frames were drawn out and they had about 4 square inches of honey left.I guess I caught them, brought them home and gave them a feeder full of syrup and left them alone.Sense the out side frames were empty I gave them capped honey and one more drawn brood comb.I caught the queen and marked her and left her in a queen clip while I moved the frames around.Then I let her walk back in and put the lid on.So some times things work just out. [​IMG]
     
  2. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    :coolphotos: Hey you lucky dog you! :thumbsup:

    Was this just a one box hive? If so, cool that they survived just fine on 6 frames.

    Looks like you slathered some devil egg on her back...now where's the paprika? :shock: :lol:
     

  3. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Nice pics! :thumbsup:
    What's all that green stuff under your hive? :lol:
     
  4. jb63

    jb63 New Member

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    Yes Omie,lucky dog is appropriate.But they made it through on four frames.The outside two were not drawn out.
    And Perry the green stuff is what's under your white stuff.:wink:
     
  5. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    No, under our white stuff there's mud. The seasons we have are: Mostly winter, early mud season, a long weekend called summer, and late mud season.
     
  6. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    small closters don't requite much food for winter as long as they can handle the cold temps.
    Pete you mist the month of horse fly season.
     
  7. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    jb-
    "they made it through on four frames."

    jb, what line of bees are you keeping? btw, our green stuff is under numerous layers of ice and snow....:grin:
     
  8. jb63

    jb63 New Member

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    Hi River, those are from a swarm trap.The only queens I ever bought were three russel caucasians ,of which one is still alive after two winters. I also buy about three cordovans from Cal. ,[a neighbor gets a bundle of them] .I only have fifteen colonies counting four nucs. and this box so to answer the question of what line they are a mixed bag.
     
  9. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I have heard some good reports jb63 on what are called Olympus Wilderness bees. have you tried any of those?
     
  10. jb63

    jb63 New Member

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    Hi Tech. I haven't tried the oly's but I'm going up there to pick up four moonbeams that I ordered two yrs ago.They had weather problems last yr and didn't get them shipped.Sense then russle franchised so I'm just going to drive up to get my moonbeams.While I'm there I was going to get a northern sunkist and a couple of Olympics.I'll let you know how they work out.
     
  11. lazy shooter

    lazy shooter New Member

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    This title really tweaks me up. My bees came to me in April of 2011. It would take a decent sized book for me to describe all the wrong things I did to those three hives. As they say, "God is Gracious," and my bees made it into 2012. As of this writing, all three hives look to come out of this winter in good shape. I purchased three splits last summer and they too are doing well. Again, the title is so appropriate to my beekeeping.
     
  12. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Not being near major bee operations is a big plus. I've had almost no mites since I cleaned up what the bees came with, and as long as no one else tries to keep bees near me, I hope all things will continue. My first year bees, they didn't make it. But it was the robbers on the 2nd hive. First hive, probably mites and definitely stupidity on my part
     
  13. lazy shooter

    lazy shooter New Member

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    I share your thoughts about mites. There isn't a commercial beekeeper within 60 miles of my apiaries. The feral bee population is slim due to the lack of forage. Like you, I am hopeful that this will be a big assistance in mite control.