beetle traps

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by bwwertz, Dec 16, 2011.

  1. bwwertz

    bwwertz New Member

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    Hello, all! I'm looking for a cheap but effective way to take care of small hive beetles in my hive as well as my Dad's (twinclw on the forum) :D . I prefer not to "medicate" our girls and have found a beetle trap online that looks like it won't be too terrible to remove and reuse during the winter (as long as I'm quick about it). Was wondering your opinion on whether I should even treat these during the winter and if this looks like a good option.
    Thank you for your insight! Here's the link to the "beetle Jail" on Brushy Mountain Bee Farm's site.
    http://www.brushymountainbeefarm.com/Be ... tinfo/647/

    Thank you!
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I tried some of these and they are marginally effective but difficult to fill and manipulate. They seem to work best when placed in the outside and top position of the hive. a bit of thin plastic (laminate like you might use to protect sheets of paper) laid across the beetle jail and extending to the outside wall of the box seems to help direct the shb to the trap.

    i myself have never bought a beetle trap (the one I have were given to me by a bee keeping friend to try) but do use other methods to combat the shb. other methods essentially means I feed weak hive, boost if a hive numbers are critically low and freeze severely infected frames.

    is the shb problem really bad at your location?
     
  4. bwwertz

    bwwertz New Member

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    Iddee, I think you forgot to post the link you suggested. Look forward to seeing that one. =)

    tecumseh, I've never had much of a problem before - seen one here and there occasionally, but the last time I opened my hive I saw three beetles on one frame and the bees seemed to be much fewer than what I remember last winter so I wanted to be proactive in the beetle problem. Really scratching my head over the state of affairs in my hive this time of year as opposed to where they were this time last year. Maybe my memory just really stinks. =)
     
  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    OOPS! Old age setting in. It has been edited. Sorry.
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    bw writes:
    Really scratching my head over the state of affairs in my hive this time of year as opposed to where they were this time last year. Maybe my memory just really stinks.

    tecumseh:
    well first off bwwertz I want to thank your dad for informing me that you are of the female persuasion. I came to beekeeping when there were very few females around and look how the world has changed. not only do we have very active female beekeepers but a good number of the science folks who are confronting the current challenges in beekeeping are also female. the change is great but invariable this 'old mind' want to call every person in the bee yard sir.

    as to your thinking on the shb.... a small number of hive beetles I would not worry so much about. in the fall of the year as the population contracts and there are fewer and fewer bees to guard the furtherest recess of the hive it is quite common to see them on the outside frames (if on a very empty frame a bump on a top cover get these dislodged and it is quite fun to stab them with your hive tool... proper sporting etiquette require you to only use the point of the hive tool... splatting the shb with the the flat portion of a hive tool will get you a yellow flag and a 15 yard penalty<repeated and intentional violation will NOT get you tossed from the game however).

    and finally although some things will be approximately the same from year to year and season to season some thing will also create differences within a hive that can appear extremely different. a lot of times the prior season' condition and the age of the queen in the box are primary cause of what can appear to be large differences <I would guess for most folks knowing which of these differences do or do not matter is really the challenge.
     
  7. bwwertz

    bwwertz New Member

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    Thank you, tecumseh. =) Yes, I'm of the female persuasion and was introducted to beekeeping as a very wee tot by my Dad. lol. =) I was fascinated by it then and wanted to get into it again as soon as I was able to.
    I tend to be OVERLY analytical in most aspects of my life and it is certainly no different with beekeeping. I like to like to try to solve the puzzle of things. Can you also tell I'm in the medical/science field? =) I think that's also why I like beekeeping - because there are puzzles there that I can't solve, but it's sure fun trying!

    Thanks again!
    =)
     
  8. bwwertz

    bwwertz New Member

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    Iddee, Great link & video! Now I'll be asking around for some used political signs. =) Definitely may have to save that treatment for the warmer weather though. =(
     
  9. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    You can stick a wire in them and slide them in the entrance and let them lay on the bottom board near the back. Then you can pull them out and replace them at any time in any weather.


    Are you familiar with these folks. They are a great bunch of people who really enjoy their bees.


    http://www.crystalcoastbeekeepers.com/

    Also, member beehandler only lives 12 mile from you in Maysville. He and his wife are very friendly folks.
     
  10. Mama Beek

    Mama Beek New Member

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    we've tried several different kinds of traps and had ok luck with most of them. The homemade traps actually seemed to be more effective for us than any that we had bought. The ones like the video that Iddee posted work well, but we continually forget that we've put them in there and then they don't get changed. We made some with sandwich containers and baited them with cotton balls soaked with apple cider vinegar and couldn't believe the number of beetles that we caught in them!

    We didn't see a significant reduction in shb population until we started spreading ashes from the fireplace under the hives. We are now experimenting with lime and diatomaceous earth as well just out of plain old curiosity.
     
  11. Zulu

    Zulu Member

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    Here is another thread where CD cases were used

    viewtopic.php?f=13&t=4037

    I used them pretty succesfully.

    I also bought a 50 lb bag of diatomaceous earth on Amazon, but it rained at the time and then I got too busy at work. It will be spread out this summer under the hives.

    What was interesting for me , was using Quick Strips for the mites in the fall, and how many beetles dropped in one of the hives on day 5. Only one of the treated hives had this happen, but over 50 dropped out dead.
     
  12. Mama Beek

    Mama Beek New Member

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    As far as we can tell Zulu that is the biggest drawback with the DE, vs the lime or ashes....it has to be changed every single time it gets wet where ashes and lime don't. For us ashes are a win since we always have plenty and there is no cost involved in either time or dollars.
     
  13. Tia

    Tia New Member

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    I'm one of those folks who believe the bees have to work it out for themselves. I used to fog for varroa but have found that my girls do just fine without any help. Then SHB came along and I lost a few boxes of honey. Tried the traps with very little success. Now I use a very natural approach: (1) strong hives (2) only 2 or 3 honey supers on at a time, and (3) chickens in the bee yard to scratch up and eat the larva! This past summer, I still saw a few SHB in each hive and would squish them with my hive tool, but that was all. It's a little more work because I'm harvesting more often (used to only do it once at 4th of July), but the upside is that more frequent harvests are giving me more varieties of honey rather than just mixing the entire year's honey into one.