Best place to place my hives

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by SuiGeneris, Sep 19, 2017.

  1. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    That sounds really good.
     
  2. SuiGeneris

    SuiGeneris Member

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    A little fancier than my plan...on the topic of snow, I assume its OK if the hive gets burried from time to time? We can get a lot of snow; with drifting it could easily bury most/all of a deep.
     

  3. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I live in North Texas, if i see 2 inches of snow they shut down everything. But I do have friends who keep bees in the North, one of whom was on here for a while, Camero7? I think he uses top entrances, that way the hive is still ventilated and they can take cleansing flights even in deep snow.
     
  4. SuiGeneris

    SuiGeneris Member

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  5. ccjersey

    ccjersey Member

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    With the right charger and plenty of grounds, it will absolutely keep anything with a brain out. I had a bull with cows next to my house for many years. One particular bull got more and more aggressive and would come to the fence whenever anyone was out in the yard to bellow, paw the ground and eventually push on the fence. Once he started that I installed an electric fence box and a single wire along the yard fence. Had to have someone go in the field with a tractor to attract him to the other side of the field while I put the wire up. As soon as it was hot, we let him come and "investigate" the wire. It actually took two pops before he left it alone. I was astounded that he came back for the second try but I guess the hormones were running high!
     
  6. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Member

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    if the snow gets up to the entrance of the hive I will clear it as soon as possible to let the bees fly out if they want on warmer days and for ventilation...
     
  7. SuiGeneris

    SuiGeneris Member

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    Thanks everyone. @ccjersey, I grew up dealing with cattle...their problem is that they are dumb, so they usually need more than one jolt before they figure things out. A pig will see another pig get shocked and that's enough for them to learn - no need to experience the jolt themselves. I've seen cattle run to (and then into) a fence after a member of the herd get zapped...experiential learners I guess ;)
     
  8. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I use an electric fence on my chicken pen to keep my dogs out (as one played chickens last year, a pup, killed all my young birds. my old dogs are pretty good with hens). Fortunately it doesn't take a strong current to get their attention.
     
  9. SuiGeneris

    SuiGeneris Member

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    My dog's blind so I think our chickens will do alright. Of course, we keep our chickens in tractors, so even a sighted dog would find it hard to get at the birds.

    On a bee-related note, a little more reading has led me to think that I need to use a top entrance in winter, given the amount of snow we get here some years. Tar paper wrap also appears to be the norm around here...another couple of things to build!
     
  10. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Top entrances do seem to be preferred for deep snow areas. And tar paper. But some kind of ventilation, the top entrance doubles as that I think. (If I ever move north I'm in trouble)
     
  11. SuiGeneris

    SuiGeneris Member

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    Looks like a lot of people flip the inner lid of the hive upside down in winter, and place a wedge under one side of the upper - allows the top to act as an entrance/ventilation, and the angle on the lid keeps moisture from dripping back down.

    There is so much to figure out, and I haven't even built my boxes yet!
     
  12. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Member

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    my first winter that the bees made it through with no issues( the year before mites got to them as I had the hive not in full sun and didnt treat for mites going into the winter, now I do) I was just using a piece of plywood on the top and it had spaces where it didnt seal, so I suppose it was ventilated on its own, this year I have a top board with an entrance and top that comes down over it, thats on long island, a few people I know upstate NY dont do anything different or wrap their hives , some have a few hives others 20 or more, losing hives upstate doesnt seem to have any pattern, one friend lost a hive inbetween 2 that came through the winter fine..another mystery of why..
     
  13. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    why is very often mites, or the viruses they carry Bob. This is good information though, I don't know much about dealing with the cold.