Best selling kinds of honey containers?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Indiana Dave, Dec 12, 2011.

  1. Indiana Dave

    Indiana Dave New Member

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    For the past 2 years I have been selling my honey in glass mason jars~pint and quart size. I have no problem selling them but I am considering going to plastic bottles and /or bears. Just curious what those of you who have successful operations use and what are your best selling sizes/kinds of containers.

    :thumbsup: Thanks for your input and help!
    Dave
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I started out selling just as you did, mason jars.
    Then I went to purpose honey jars from a supplier (fancy lids with a bee on a flower picture on it, and a comb pattern in the glass along the top and bottom).
    When the price of those skyrocketed I went to basic and simple purpose honey jars from a different supplier. Dress em up with cards tied on with rafia, gives it that hand done look instead of labels.

    [​IMG]

    (When I say purpose, I mean that up here in Canada if you are selling honey, it must be sold by weight (and labelled), so there are jars that when filled work out to exactly 500 grams, 1 kilogram, etc. Harder to do with mason jars, you end up with weird numbers)
    I stopped selling plastic bears (even though they sold well) when that whole BPA thing took off. My wife won't microwave anything in plastic etc. and I figured if we weren't prepared to do it I shouldn't expect my customers have to. When asked and I explain why I don't sell the bear most folks are understanding, some even appreciative.
    Just a personal thing, no offence to anyone selling bears!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     

  3. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    I use the plastic squeeze bottles w/lids bought from Mann Lake. The 2 most popular sizes I''ve found are the 8 oz. and the 1 lb. bottles. They are cheaper than the bears.
    Ohio requires the name and address of the honey producer on the container, so I order my labels custom printed from ML. I also get the nutrition facts labels for the back of the containers. This is not required by my state, but makes for a professional looking package.
    A little bit of marketing strategy I picked up is: your average consumer groups honey bees in with other flying critters that sting (wasps, hornest, etc.) so I don't get labels showing bees. I get the labels showing a field of clover.
    Some folks like the "home made" look of the mason jars, so I wouldn't give up on them entirely.
     
  4. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    I use both, glass and plastic. I like the Golden Harvast glass quarts and pints, they have a smooth side for my lables. (the one with a picture of a skep with bees flying around it) Here in SW Mo. we have to have our name, address, and weight on the label,i buy them printed from Mann Lake.If the customer brings back the (clean glass jar ) i knock $.25 off their next purchase. We run them through the dishwasher and reuse them. We use the 12oz and 24oz plastic bears and will sell two cases of each at the Farmers Market, and at home, every year, my wife makes the labels off the printer for the bears. We tell our customers not to put the honey in the microwave to turn it back, that if they do all they will have afterwards is syrup that taste like honey, that it kills all the enzymes and nutrient out of it. We have a lable that tells them how to liquefy crystalized honey with boiling water. My wife and i like the one on one talks with our customers, and so do they. We learn what they want and we try to answer there questions (and they have alot of them) so we all learn. :thumbsup: Jack
     
  5. rast

    rast New Member

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    1 lb. plastic bottles and flip top lids from Dadant. Qt. mason jars to some that like it that way. Labeled.
     
  6. ShaneVBS

    ShaneVBS New Member

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    In our store the plastic bears were popular, they sold out before anything. The more experianced honey buyers goes for the glass. I also noticed something I woulda never thunk. Most walkins prefered the bottles and jars with the crappy labels over the nice fancy ones. Weird
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    Shane writes:
    Most walkins prefered the bottles and jars with the crappy labels over the nice fancy ones. Weird

    tecumseh:
    weird perhaps not but none the less a quite interesting observation in regards to customer preferences. what does this suggest that the customer is telling you?
     
  8. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Is the jars with the crappy labels cheaper? :mrgreen: Jack
     
  9. ShaneVBS

    ShaneVBS New Member

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    My theory is that they are looking for local honey and the home made crappy label does not look commercially packaged. I had all sizes and types on display from different bee keepers with various labels and of course some of my own. I had to take mine off shelves because they were buying all of mine and not others. I know the queenline was not popular, so I dought I will package in those again. And probably will not use as much glass next year
     
  10. ShaneVBS

    ShaneVBS New Member

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    O and there all same price according to size
     
  11. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    Shane writes:
    My theory is that they are looking for local honey and the home made crappy label does not look commercially packaged.

    tecumseh:
    that would be my guess also. it certainly suggest fancy bottle and fancy labels without getting some kind of extra dollars for the effort is a bit of a waste?

    then Shane adds:
    I know the queenline was not popular, so I dought I will package in those again. And probably will not use as much glass next year

    tecumseh:
    some times the negative remarks in regards to marketing and customer's preferences is just (if not more) valuable than positive remarks.

    and thanks for sharing you observation here. quite useful.
     
  12. rast

    rast New Member

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    While we are talking containers, I'm sure most here know that 1lb of honey is considered 12 fluid ounce's while a pint mason jar is 16 fluid ounces and should be priced accordingly.
    Most of us being small (relative) honey producers usually just price according to the current market. If pure, natural American honey was sold on the NY or Chicago commodity exchange it would be sky high right now. Don't take the fun out of it, but keep track of your expenses for 1 year and lb's of honey produced in that year. Do the math and see how much an ounce of honey cost you to produce.
     
  13. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    If you do as rast says, don't show your wife the figures. She will burn your hives and take your credit card away. :eek:
     
  14. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    :lol: :rolling: :rotfl: Toooooo funny.................................But true! :shock: :mrgreen:
     
  15. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

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    So in Canada the weight of the jar is counted as well?
     
  16. Bens-Bees

    Bens-Bees New Member

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    Honey for sale, $250.00 a pound! :lol:
     
  17. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    Bens writes:
    So in Canada the weight of the jar is counted as well?

    tecumseh:
    beyond Rast well made remarks in regards to the size of the jar and the weight of honey it contains, also remember that not all honey in any give sized container (pint, quart or gallon) will have the same weight. here honey is somewhat lighter typically tipping the scale at about 11.5# per gallon. farther north (I am personally referencing North Dakota here) where the sweet clover and alfalfa are the primary nectar sources honey can be more like 12# per gallon.
     
  18. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Weight is for contents only, not the jar itself. Purpose jars give you nice round weight number versus a mason jar that you might have to label as say 1435 grams. Darn metric system!
    Let me know if you get any sales at that price Ben, I'll move there if I have to. :mrgreen:
     
  19. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    I bought one of those $200+ scales for our farmers market sales, it has the tare weight on it. :thumbsup: The state of Mo. sends weight scale inspectors around to check scales anywhere they sell produce,ect., by the pound. If i wasn't at the farmers market they've came to my home. :roll: The charge was $5.00 for years,two years ago it went to $10.00, this year it was $15.00. We tare weigh each type of jar with the lid before we start filling them. I told the inspector, that he was going to have to quit having so many kids, or i won't be able to afford him. :mrgreen: Jack
     
  20. rast

    rast New Member

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    Fortunately ($), or unfortunately, my wife is the finance director of the Early Learning Coalition of Lake Co. Fl.. She has a very keen eye on my bee expenditures and income from it. Its all in Excel. She is very happy so far, cheapest "hobby" I ever had.
    Wow! Some husbands actually get their own credit card? :lol: