Best selling kinds of honey containers?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Indiana Dave, Dec 12, 2011.

  1. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    rast writes:
    She is very happy so far, cheapest "hobby" I ever had.

    tecumseh:
    after hearing stories of the money folks spend to fish or hunt or rear horses this statement is without a doubt one of the best promotion line for bee keeping I have read in recent times.

    <back to subject> the best glass I sell honey in is recycled from my customers (and it is free). almost any glass will do... I do inform customers that I do need the caps since these come in way to many sizes to acquire the caps in any kind of economical fashion. a defect or bit of rust on the cap is my culling criterion. since this also lowers my container cost to just about zero, it also means I can sell a certain quantity of my honey at a very much reduced price.
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I am always happy when I get some jars back from customers, cuts way down on the cost. When I order jars I have to always order a bunch of extra lids (4-6 cents each) because no matter how good the condition is, the lid is not allowed to be reused as per our Canadian Food Inspection edicts. :(
     

  3. Indiana Dave

    Indiana Dave New Member

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    Thanks for all of the good info here guys. I appreciate it!!
     
  4. ThreeSmilin'Dogs

    ThreeSmilin'Dogs New Member

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    Anyone ever use Muth jars. I really like the look of these and from what I read, they were developed specifically for honey many years ago. I would like to find a source for them?
    I found a picture here:
    http://www.nativeherbsandhoney.com/muth_jar.JPG

    Thanks
     
  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Dadant, Brushy Mountain, and many other suppliers have them.
     
  6. Indiana Dave

    Indiana Dave New Member

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    How about cut comb? A good seller for any of you? Poor seller?

    Don't want to invest in the whole kit thing where the bees draw out comb in small circles or squares on specialized frames...just gonna use shallow supers, thin foundation without wires and a comb cutting tool. Any suggestions?
    Thanks again, Dave.
     
  7. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Even cut comb honey requires some special hive handling. I would just use a couple of thin surplus sheets in your super frames the first year to see how it goes, if you only have a few hives. If you have 5 or more, you might try a shallow on one hive.
     
  8. Indiana Dave

    Indiana Dave New Member

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    What kind of special hive handling are you referring to? I don't know anyone in my area that does cut comb so I am relying on all the great info here. I just figured I'd use thin foundation without wires on shallow frames in a shallow box. Then pull it off once the honey was capped and cut out the squares from the frames for packaging. Keep the info coming.... :beg:
     
  9. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    Dave:
    The problem you may run into is that with the thin surplus foundation has no support. The bigger the sheet the less stable it will be. Are you going to be using shallow (western) or medium supers for honey?
    Mann Lake sells a complete kit for cut-comb production. Catalog #HK-255 for 10 frame and HK-625 for 8 frame. Both sell for $79.95. They comtain a 5-5/8 in. super, frames w/thin surplus foundation, containers, etc.
     
  10. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Hopefully, someone with more experience will chime in. I only know you have to time it right with the flow. Too soon, and the thin surplus will be damaged, too late and the flow won't be enough to get it fully capped. Leave it on to long, and they will dirty the cappings.

    C'mon, you old timers, help me out here.
     
  11. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Well, I've never done comb honey before, but I hope to try this next year as well. Got the thin foundation and the 5 3/4" supers. From what I understand so far, Iddee is right, you want it pulled and capped FAST and then removed (no travel stains on your cappings). To get this you need a good flow and a populous, almost cramped hive. I have read (not sure where :oops: ) that some will reduce a double deep to a single and then put on the comb super. Not sure what would prevent the queen from quickly moving up. There's got to be some experience here on this.
     
  12. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    IndianaDave writes:
    How about cut comb?

    tecumseh:
    I am not certain what cut comb means but I do some comb honey that I sell in wide mouth pint jars as 'chunk honey'. I kind of got off into that via some encouragement from my wife. I implement this (I think???) much like suggested by iddee above.... that is I use thin foundation in very old shallow frames and harvest any nicely capped frames so there is really no special equipment. I do freeze the frames to kill any potential bugs. here a bit of chunk honey in the jar sells extremely well to the hispanic crowd.
     
  13. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Here are a couple of pics of the "fancy" purpose jars (500g. bee lid and comb pattern edges in glass). They sold really well but then the price jumped big time. Add in shipping and taxes I would have had to add a $1 to the price of the jar with honey. I went with the "plain" jar for a third of the cost and kept my price the same, just dolled them up as in the previous photo.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  14. Indiana Dave

    Indiana Dave New Member

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    I use mediums for honey but I recently purchased some (5 3/4" or 5 5/8") shallows because I the price was right (real cheap, actually) and because I was running out of mediums. Figured I could use regular wired foundation for honey production and thin surplus non-wired foundation for comb production. Plus I wanted to avoid the $60 to $80 kits for cut comb.
    Good info coming in here on this, thanks guys!
     
  15. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm Active Member

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    There are many ways and methods of producing comb honey, it has become a big seller for me. I use the shallow frames for my comb honey, and the thin no wire foundation. This is the way i put the foundation in the frames, i slice the thin foundation to make 3 strips out of one sheet, i wedge it in the frame as tight as i can get it. Then use the side pins or bobby pins on the sides to hold it straight. You can cut 4 strips from a sheet of foundation but it makes it hard for the side pins to catch the foundation. Now, i have an old crock pot that i use to melt cappings for this purpose,i will hold the frame at an angle and spoon the wax on top of the wedge with foundation in place, so it will run the full lenght of the frame, this will keep the foundation from falling out of the frames and keep the foundation straight. :thumbsup: One of the best Authors for producing comb honey is Richard Tayor, he gone now, but you can find many of his writings in the older BC mags. and he also had a book on producing comb honey. Maybe iddee or tec. knows where to get one. Jack
     
  16. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    Mann Lake sells the book "Comb Honey Basics" by Richard Taylor. Catalog #BM-785. $4.95.
     
  17. Indiana Dave

    Indiana Dave New Member

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  18. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    Yeah, but with amazon you get free shipping :rolling:
     
  19. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm Active Member

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    For that price they should hand deliver. :lol: Jack
     
  20. ShaneVBS

    ShaneVBS New Member

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    Im gona try this methed......Slice 1 inch wide strips of cut comb foundation and hot wax it into top bar. I want my cut comb to be 100% foundationless, mostly because of the harmfull chemicals there finding in foundation now. And I will leave 1 inch of comb when cutting out, so still no foundation in my cut comb. I want to advertise 100% freshly made unprocessed foundation cut comb. And hopefully get a premium. Just make sure hive is level lol