Best selling kinds of honey containers?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Indiana Dave, Dec 12, 2011.

  1. Marbees

    Marbees Member

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    Instead of wax strips you can use paint sticks from Home Depot, or cut your own. Just glue it to the top bar with food grade glue. No hot wax or chemicals.
    In 10 frame box , at the ends install drown frames, and 8 foundationless frames in between.
    When bees start drawing wax, remove those end frames, and let bees make 8 fat frames of comb honey.
    Tested it this year on one hive. Heavenly taste.
    Select strong hives in the strong nectar flow.
     
  2. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm Active Member

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    ShaneVBS, have you produced comb honey before? With the method i posted above, the bees have produced the most beautiful pure white honey i ever had. I use a queen excluder and have a top entrance on my comb honey hives. Keeps the queen out, and the top entrance reduces less tracking. Using the melted cappings to wax the one or one and a half inch starter strips in the frames, i think, gives off a in hive comb smell and the bees seem to take to it quicker.I use a clear plastic type sandwich box to sell my ciomb honey, i have a box for 8oz. and 16oz. comb honey. If anyone wants the brand name and stock number, i can look it up, my wife makes a small label for them on the printer. Jack
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    Shane writes:
    I want my cut comb to be 100% foundationless, mostly because of the harmfull chemicals there finding in foundation now.

    tecumseh:
    not such a bad idea but...

    not that long ago the science folks were talking about using bee hives as an environmental monitor since they pick up almost everything in any given spot. I would guess there are exception but 'almost everything' means pollutants in the soil, air and water very quickly begin accumulating in the bees and the hive. so unless your location is in a fairly remote location contamination of one sort or the other is almost unavoidable.

    marsbee writes:
    Select strong hives in the strong nectar flow.

    tecumseh:
    the above are the critical or essential factors for producing comb honey.
     
  4. sqkcrk

    sqkcrk New Member

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    A currently popular container is the 8oz plastic bottle. It takes a Honeybear cap. I get mine from a supplier who gets them from Gamber. My Glass supplier was out of 8oz classic glass jars, so I took the box of plastic and found that they flew off the shelf. Maybe it's just something new for the customer.

    The 1lb Invert/No Drip Plastic bottle from Gamber Container sells well. It comes smooth ribbed or w/ a honeycomb embossed look to the plastic. Customers like the No Drip lid.

    Restaurants like the Half Gallon Jug. I buy mine from a guy who produces Apple Cider. A New Bag of 108 costs about 25 or 30 cents per jug including the cap. They make good yd rent containers if you have outyards.

    This year I paid yd rent w/ crystalized honey took back from stores and some left over from previous years. I had quite a bit of crystalizing this year for some reason.
     
  5. ShaneVBS

    ShaneVBS New Member

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    No ive never done cut comb, but have read a lot on it. And I believe they will take to foundation faster than paint sticks from what ive read. But im sure it works too

    As far as chemical free wax, your right you never know where your bees forage. But key work is unprocessed which means 100% fresh wax from my bees. Which is better than processed wax coming from who knows where. Not to mention it retains 100% of my local forage, not someones elses. I personaly wouldnt want to eat foundation so I dont want to sell it.

    I have the sandwhich containers too. They seem the most attractable to me. Just need to figure out my labels.
     
  6. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm Active Member

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    shaneVBS, my wife went through the Avery co. on the internet for our lables. I've never used the paint stick method, but it probably works if you know what your doing. They draw the foundation strips (most of the time) straight down when i keep ten frames in the super. I have tried 8 or 9 frames in the super to make the comb thicker and sometimes it works, but most of the time they build bridge comb between the frames ( the wider space) and when you pull the frame out you make a mess :eek: . Maybe i'm wrong but, i don't worry about chemicals in the fresh comb that the bees make, i figure if it didn't kill the bees when they made it, then it's probably not going to kill me. Kind of like the canary in the coal mine thing. :mrgreen: Jack
    PS. the 8oz. comb honey sells better for me, i sold over 400 boxes at $4.00 a box this year. :thumbsup:
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    i am with Jack on this one... even if his brain is frozen up by wearing an Army helmet in the winter time.

    I suspect origin and manufacturing process resolves a lot of the chemical issues in wax. wax come generally from two initial sources. yellow wax comes from capping, so almost by definition it is extremely new and subject to little bee keeper applied chemicals. brown wax comes from rendering old comb with steam and pressure (essentially a large press) and likely poses the largest contamination potential... most of this is then bleached (my understanding either hydrogen peroxide or oxalic acid).

    it would be interesting to find out where the folks that produce foundation obtain their raw input and how this wax is then processed prior to being turned into sheets.
     
  8. Indiana Dave

    Indiana Dave New Member

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    WOW!! I can't believe the cost of the plastic containers for selling cut comb! The nice plastic ones are $1 each. Even the paper boxes Kelley's sells are $58/100 boxes. What do some of you sell your cut comb in as an alternative to expensive fancy plastic boxes?
     
  9. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm Active Member

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    tec. i have never done it, but have heard that some beekeepers trade blocks of beeswax to suppliers like Kelly ect. for foundation? Anyone here done this? Jack
     
  10. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    kelley 'use to' have a paragraph or so in their catalog as to price for working up folks beewax into foundation. I assume they still do the same thing. most folks that use to do that were extremely picky as to the kind of wax they would take. one of the commercial fellows I worked for was exclusively with Sue Bee Coop... we took all his wax to Sue Bee and got a credit for foundation from Dadant.
     
  11. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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  12. Zulu

    Zulu Member

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    I went with Sailor plastics , from a link someone posted here previously.

    Good selection, sent me free samples in advance too.
     
  13. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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