Black Mold in Top Feeder

Discussion in 'Pests and Diseases' started by jcb500, Sep 24, 2012.

  1. jcb500

    jcb500 New Member

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    HI,

    I'm a bit of a NewBeek. Have a few questions for you Old Heads.
    Location is Eastern Border of NY, close to Bennington VT. I am
    in the mountains, the hive is on a endangered Native Woodland Plant
    Rescue Nursery.

    Hive is three years old, swarmed 3X last year, none this year, because I gave them better
    living condidions ( more supers)
    I've been getting about 100 lbs of Honey for the last two years from one hive.

    Questions

    1. Top feeder (BeeMax Hive from BetterBee) is lined w/ black Mold, Should I scrub it out?
    If so what soap or cleaning agent?

    2. Lots of brown spots on bottom board and front of hive. This isn't good, right? Bees sick?
    Is this time to treat w/ Fumagilin-B?

    3. I took off two medium supers of honey, am leaving 1 medium for the hive to have over winter.
    There are two more medium supers on hive, one has 25% comb, no Honey ,and the other is
    about 80% Comb and Honey, and not more that 50% Capped.
    Do I leave these on for a Upstate NY Winter?

    Regards

    Joe in NY
     
  2. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    1. A little bleach in water when you brush /wash the feeder should do the job. Make sure you rinse it off well. Truth be told, the bees manage to coexist with the mold, so don't worry if some remains. They do a good job of cleaning it themselves.
    2. Sounds like your diagnosis is right on target--feed fumagillin.
    3. Try to condence the sealed food frames toward center, let them clean out the uncapped honey from the sides. Don't leave empty supers on the hive, it just means they have to heat up a larger space.
     

  3. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Hey Joe:

    Can't help with the beemax thing because I am not sure if scrubbing with a bleachy solution might damage it.

    If the brown spots are dysentry and it's bad, Fumagilan-B (if you are treating) is the right product. You might also want to make sure you have adequate ventilation.

    Are you running double deep brood chambers? If so, is the top one full of stores (or almost)? I would remove the super that has 25% comb and no honey, no point in leaving that on there at all. Leave the one with 80% comb and honey.
    If you do not have additional stores of honey in that top deep, I think only having 1 super for NY is not near enough.
     
  4. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Ha ha, Efmesch beat me to it! :thumbsup: :lol:
     
  5. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Perry, Looks like we think pretty much alike, :thumbsup:
     
  6. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    If you don't have any top entrances or top ventilation holes, you should probably add some to help ventilation. Dysentary thrives in a closed up hive, and winter condensation can be a death knell.
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    what Omie said + nosema is known to like cool and damp conditions. ventilation as she suggest can be critical as can be the location where you have the hive placed. in any possible damp location even the direction of the entrances can be critical in regards to minimizing nosema.

    I think perhaps I drove thru your little town this summer. I wanted to stop the night and take a good look around but there was no place in the Inn.... actually if the place is where I think it is the rooms were a bit too pricey so we must kept truckin' on down the line.