Bleeding Heart Plants

Discussion in 'General Gardening' started by Semento, Nov 19, 2010.

  1. Semento

    Semento New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    The name feels funny but it is and important type of plants which are used abundantly in moon gardens. They are plants that are classified in plant taxonomy as Dicentra spectabilis. These plants are herbaceous perennials. The major characteristic feature of Bleeding hearts is that they usually reach a height of 2’- 3’ with a similar spread. The flowers are either pink or white and are bloomed in April or May. Another species of bleeding hearts named Dutchman’s breeches which is named under the plant taxonomy Dicentra cucullaria bears white flowers that truly do remind one of pairs of plants hung out to dry. There is also another variety named fringed bleeding hearts (Dicentra eximia) that bears dusty pink blooms, and their foliage is prized for its fringe like structure. Bleeding heart plats grow in partial shade to full shade, in a well drained soil that has plenty of humus. Traditionally people choose these plants for their shade gardens. After the plants are done with flowering, their foliage tends to die back and they leave behind vacant spots in the planting bed. You should water them after flowering with liberal doses of water so that you could retard die back. Also you could surround bleeding hearts with hosta plants and other shade loving perennial flowers that will fill in those vacant spots during the summer so that it will retard die back. Also another important specialty of bleeding hearts plants is that they striking enough to warrant their use specimen plants in spring. They have heart shaped flowers from which a little drop of blood dangles at the bottom.People who seek the help of building consultancy to get help on matters of various plants which add beauty to the garden.
     
  2. BeeHunter

    BeeHunter New Member

    Messages:
    222
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Mom used to have a huge bleeding heart plant back in Colorado. I have tried a few times to get them going here in MO but havent had much luck. I dont think I have enough cool shade yet. We do have "boy britches" or Dutchman Breeches growing out in my timber. didnt know they where related. Thanks for the info!