Blooming early

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by indypartridge, Jun 24, 2010.

  1. indypartridge

    indypartridge New Member

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    We've had an unusually hot, humid and rainy June here in Indiana. Corn is 5-6 feet tall and it's only the 3rd week of June - typically we're happy if it's knee high by now At our local bee club meeting last week, we discussed how far ahead plant growth & bloom is compared to a normal summer. Many of our late summer and early fall plants are beginning to bloom (sumac) or getting close (goldenrod). With this accelerated rate of growth, we're worried about what's gonna be left from July through October.

    What are other parts of the country seeing?
     
  2. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    Everything is a bit early here, too, by a couple weeks. The bad part is that my raspberries will be in full swing... when I'm on vacation! Happy birds and deer, I guess.
     

  3. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper New Member

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    Kare and I have been talking about this very thing for several weeks now. Yesterday I was commenting on our front door garden. The Cone flowers are starting to bloom about 3 to 4 weeks early. Black Eyed Susans also about 4 to 6 weeks early. Liratis is early also.
    Saving grace may be the reblooming of clovers as I am seeing white clover reblooming in the vacant fields.
    Golden Rod may stay in bloom longer as well as Asters. I'm going to be keeping a close eye on stuff and when I see the Golden Rod and Asters I'm pulling all honey supers full or not. I can always extract uncapped stuff and feed it back rather than be greedy and loose lots of bees or buy tons of sugar.

    :mrgreen: Al
     
  4. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Al, i must be missing something? i thought that goldenrod was the main flow in your country.Here in S.W. Mo. you rarely see bees on goldenrod but they do work the aster.It seems things are a little early here also, the bees are just now starting to work the dutch clover, the sweet clover is in full bloom and the sumac is starting to bloom ( we have four different varieties and they bloom at different times) and then the mints will start ( some already have). Honey production is looking good here,i'm out of supers and have been making up comb honey supers to slow them up :thumbsup: . Jack
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I can't say the bloom was particularly early here in Texas this year but everything that did bloom certainly didn't bloom in it's regular sequence. this year was the first year that I didn't see (sounds like) wa-he-ya (spanish spelled with a g or h) bloom.
     
  6. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    Tec, perhaps that is "weigela," which is a flowering shrub? I have one here, and it bloomed like crazy, but early and not for very long. Past now.
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    In ABC/XYZ spelled Guajillo and then Huajilla but sound something like my initial spelling. Blooms extremely early and is indeed a thorny bush with a bright orange bloom. It is related to the acacia family.
     
  8. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper New Member

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    Right now our main flow is Bass wood trees, alsaic clover, alafa and both yellow and white clover. Golden rod is the fall flow here but most no greedy bee keepers pull the honey supers and let the bees fill up on winter stores of it and Asters. It normally blooms in mid Sept and will go into the end of Oct barring a hard frost.
    If every thing goes like it has been the Northern Bed Straw will be in bloom in about 2 weeks. Normally doesn't bloom till August.

    :mrgreen: Al
     
  9. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Even the hay forages went to seed early this year.

    Clovers were every where but the lack of rain is holding them back now.

    G3
     
  10. Tia

    Tia New Member

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    Our blooms have been either late or right on schedule. The magnolia trees, however, just keep blooming and blooming--something I've never seen them do before. And the girls absolutely frolic in their pollen.
    Goldenrod is far from blooming here and isn't supposed to start until at least late August. I, like Alleyyooper, pull all my supers at the first sign of goldenrod bloom because my girls work it like crazy and I think it's the worst honey in the world so I let my girls overwinter on it! When they pack it into their hives my entire beeyard and garden area reek! I've had more than one comment from visitors during the months of August/September/October about "what's that horrible smell?" They're shocked when I tell them it's goldenrod honey.
     
  11. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    Here its been different than most years. Looks ike we have had the longest flow for spring than we have had in a few years some things bloomes early and some bloomed late
     
  12. Dick

    Dick New Member

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    Very spoty here. Everything has/is blooming early due to the early warm weather. In my section of the county the sourwood flow is horrible, go 10 miles and the beeks are having a good year. Looks like it is going to be a long time until spring for my bees. I have been shopping for bargain sugar as it looks like I will be feeding in another few weeks. :eek: