Blueberries

Discussion in 'General Gardening' started by Hobie, Feb 5, 2012.

  1. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    It happens every year around this time: The garden catalogs come and I start dreaming about putting in a few blueberry bushes. However, I know they demand acidic soil, and mine is not. Not a pine tree on the place. I do not know if yew and arborvitae needles are acidic.

    Does anyone know how to prepare the soil for successful blueberries? If the soil is not naturally acidic, is it too much of a pain to keep amending it? I don't like the idea of having to test the soil constantly.
     
  2. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    I have read that adding coffee grounds to the soil and watering with cold coffee can raise the pH. I put both in my compost pile and it seems very happy. (although I think it raises the pH in my stomach when I drink it! ;) )

    Also, I think Miracle Grow makes an acid food for plants.
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    She wants to lower the PH, it is too high now. I can't help. Our soil has to have lime added nearly every year to keep to PH up. We never have to lower it.
     
  4. Zulu

    Zulu Member

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    Any leaf mulch, Sawdust, and peat moss all will make soil more acid. Adjust in small amounts, by digging in well.
     
  5. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    Oops! I meant to say lower - more acidic - less than 7. :oops:
     
  6. jb63

    jb63 New Member

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    Find a horse barn that uses saw dust.The horse urine raises the acid.The blueberry growers around here stockpile sawdust like crazy.
     
  7. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Hobie, i have the same problem. I talked to one of the venders at the farmers market that has blueberries, she said to use the Miracle Grow for Azalea. I'm going to try it this year, Jack
     
  8. JUDELT

    JUDELT New Member

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    wood ashes also work' if you have a fireplace or woodstove.
     
  9. JUDELT

    JUDELT New Member

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    anything contains POTASH. that's what i was trying to remember!
     
  10. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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  11. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    Thanks for all the info. And great link, slowmodem!
    I'll look around for options. It may be that I have to start well in advance to adjust the soil before ordering blueberries. Here's another good link I found:
    http://forums2.gardenweb.com/forums/loa ... 70.html?16
     
  12. RE Jones

    RE Jones New Member

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    You can also add sulfur dust to the soil. That will make the soil more acidic. That is the route that I took on my blueberry and blackberry plants. A small bag at Lowes was around $10.00.
    Robert
     
  13. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Yes there are bags of stuff you can buy at garden/feed places that increases the acidity- for hydrangeas, evergreen bushes, etc.
    I did that a couple months before planting blueberries (10 bushes) but after that I'm just putting a thick peat moss mulch on top every Spring- peat makes it more acidic and my baby blueberry bushes did very well last year- tripled their size and gave us some pints of lovely berries. This year we can't wait!
    I tested the soil before any of this and it was about as opposite from what blueberries want as could be. I think the peat moss really helps, and it's a nice fluffy mulch that I suspect makes a gentle acidic 'tea' when it rains and soaks down into the soil. I think a mulch of pine bark, pine needles, or dry oak leaves can do the same kind of thing. Within a year these mulches break down and become part of the soil, so they do help increases the acidity.