Bonehead given a second chance by the bees

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by BSAChris, Aug 12, 2013.

  1. BSAChris

    BSAChris New Member

    Messages:
    113
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Bonehead given a second chance by the bees & this forum

    This spring, I pulled bonehead move #1 and killed my new queen in a brand new package by being an oaf. I introduced a new queen a couple of days later and that seemed to go well. But then after a few weeks that one seemed to abscond (I'll guess I killed it while inspecting, although I have no proof of that, other than assuming I'm to blame, bonehead #2).

    So I started giving the queenless hive frames from the happy hive next to it; nothing happened so a while later I added another frame of eggs and bees. Then I moaned here. Then bee math was explained. Then eggs suddenly appeared. I was happy.

    Then there were no eggs in the donor hive and I realized that I had moved the queen from the good hive to the queenless hive as bonehead move #3. Well at least the new hive didn't kill her... I stayed quiet here, studied posts, ashamed...:oops: I hoped they might grow their own queen and save me from further self-inflicted humiliation. I noticed the middle three or so frames of the 2nd deep were full of capped honey - from quietly reading here, I knew that could mess up the new queen that might be coming along, so I shuffled those frames, put in undrawn foundation, and left it alone until the day I thought via "bee math" that she'd be ready to lay.

    Today I was SO relieved to find eggs, nicely standing up in the center of cells in the middle of the middle frames of the upper brood box. PHEW!

    ANyway, just wanted to say, there is so much valuable info here at Beekeepingforums - all kindly explained (repeatedly), with various options respectfully debated. I love it here :grin: I've learned so much this year, my first full season as a bee-keeper. Any success is attributed to what I've learned here (technical aspects, and patience) and of course to those hardworking bees Thank you!:thumbsup:
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    And it is after hearing stories like yours that will make many of the good people here realize that their contributions are valuable. Nothing counts like experience, and nothing is a generous as is passing it on.
    Without doubt, most of what I have learned after becoming more serious about my beekeeping was picked up on this forum.
     

  3. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

    Messages:
    2,683
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    love it when a play comes together
     
  4. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

    Messages:
    2,060
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Glad Iddee, Tec, and Efmesch, could help. Oh and all the rest of the kind sharing folks on the forum. Even Austen and Charles who keeps Humpty Dumpty put together. Seriously It is our pleasure to share our knowledge and experiences to newer bee keeps threw this forum.
     
  5. jb63

    jb63 New Member

    Messages:
    588
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Chris, your not alone.I like this forum for the same reasons,and thx to Iddee,Charls,and every one else who has a part in keeping it working.
     
  6. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

    Messages:
    3,048
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    chris, just catchin up on posts from being gone and who can pass up reading a thread that says "Bonehead given a second chance"..........:lol:

    we have all been there, done that, bonehead beekeeping........just ask some of our finest.....like perry and jack.......:lol:
    we all have stories to tell, thanks for being here, thanks for being a member, thanks for posting and sharing; like perry said:

    "it is after hearing stories like yours that will make many of the good people here realize that their contributions are valuable. Nothing counts like experience, and nothing is a generous as is passing it on."

    you will also help others along the way, and that is the generous part of passing it on chris!
     
  7. lazy shooter

    lazy shooter New Member

    Messages:
    649
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Chris:

    This forum is user friendly, period. Iddee keeps a good rein on the forum and this is just a fine bunch of folks. It's good to have you among us.

    As a sidebar, I also unintentionally moved a queen with the only split that I ever made. I didn't intend to move her, but all turned out well. It's yet another of instances where God is gracious to those with less abilities. :)
     
  8. Noronajo

    Noronajo New Member

    Messages:
    211
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I've gotten answers( usually several) to every question I've ever asked, advice that kept me from making a multitude of mistakes and wouldn't have gone from 2 to 11 hives without the shared wisdom of this forum. The only beek near us charges to mentor but this is all free and nobody EVER calls you bonehead!
     
  9. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

    Messages:
    3,708
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Those who have themselves received, find pleasure in being able to share. I've said it many times (in different ways) and will say it again (and probably many more times): The nice thing about this forum is the nice people who are its members. It's a group of beeks who, in spite of the large distances that separate them, have joined together into a closely knit group of friends. One gets the feeling that each and everyone is truly out for the benefit of the others. Insults are rare and smiles and laughs infectiously bind us all together. Forum members aren't hesitant about saying "thanks" and giving compliments. Each person's success is a source of pleasure to all of us. Failures pain us and we want to eliminate that pain as best as possible. Our bees are not a cause for competition but rather a "glue" that binds us together in spite of our many differences.
    I could go on but you get the jist of my remarks.
    Three cheers for a great forum, made great by its terriffic membership. :yahoo::yahoo::yahoo:
     
  10. lazy shooter

    lazy shooter New Member

    Messages:
    649
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Oh gee, the above is well said. You have a gift with words Ef.
     
  11. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

    Messages:
    3,276
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Well said efmesch. :thumbsup: Jack
     
  12. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Ef, some people, like you,are just naturally easy to be friendly to.

    Thanks for being here.
     
  13. BSAChris

    BSAChris New Member

    Messages:
    113
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Well, thanks to the forum again, I was able to identify and deal with Bonehead #4 issue - which was that when I thought I had a laying queen, I didn't - it became painfully obvious I had one or more laying workers in there! They weren't laying multiple eggs in cells except in one that I ever found (thought it was just an anomaly) BUT everything came up drone! Ugh!

    I decided to weigh the options I read about here, and I chose to dump out the hive and save the honey frames for the other hives. There was of course lots of pro and con advice here, and I decided that this late in the Wisconsin season, I didn't want to try to introduce a new queen to a hostile laying-worker hive, nor try to make a nuc out of some of these bees and one of my strong hives. I can tell that many of the worker bees have returned from foraging and gravitated into the good hive next door to where their hive used to be, now that their digs are gone, so in that respect I have hopefully made one hive stronger.

    Anyway, live and learn - and learn a lot here :) Hopefully I'll be able to do a split or two in the spring and end up ahead of the game - :) - gotta keep positive!

    Thanks again!
     
  14. lazy shooter

    lazy shooter New Member

    Messages:
    649
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    BSAChris:

    "gotta keep positive!" Your last phrase is your best advice. I have yet to experience a laying worker hive, but from my reading on this forum and other places, I would do the same as you and pour them out on the ground.

    When you poured them out and removed the hive box, did the bees hang around where the old box was? If so, how long did it take them to give up and go elsewhere, or could you tell?
     
  15. BSAChris

    BSAChris New Member

    Messages:
    113
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Those bees... there are hundreds of nurse bees (I guess) and drones hanging about - apparently I didn't move the hive parts far enough away from where I shook them off. Or other hives are feasting at the trough and bringing the good stuff hom. Many of them seem to be trying to raise the remaining drone brood. I managed to get 3 frames of honey away from them, but now I'm watching them with interest and occasionally pulling out an empty frame.

    They are very noisy but not aggressive - and they are very big bees so I expect most of them are drones. The frames and hive bodies are all out in the sun, because when I took them out and apart there were still some bees hanging about - I thought the first night they'd fly off and not come back, but the next day most of the frames were chock full and I thought I'd probably screwed up that also. However, they are slightly less in numbers each day. I expect in a day or two they'll have all scattered off because there's not much left on the frames.

    The colony it used to live next door to is now overflowing with worker bees; there is no fighting, and I'm not entirely sure if the hive just has hit its prime with its own hatched and grown up brood, or if the foragers from the destroyed hive have made the difference. In any case, they are going full bore up in the supers.
     
  16. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    You did well.

    The shook bees will find a home, the shook frames will be cleaned, and the receiving hives will be better prepared for winter.
    CONGRATS!
     
  17. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

    Messages:
    3,708
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    In principle, you should have made all memory of the eliminated hive "disappear", leaving no hive parts for the bees to collect in/on.
    After shaking off the bees from the frames, the honey frames go straight into a different hive, inside a new super or one of the emptied supers from the shaken hive. Sealed drone brood, after the shaking, should be scraped and put into a receiving hive (only if no varroa are found). They'll clean out the cells, using the dead brood as food. If there are varroa, put the frames with the brood in the freezer for two days and then you can put them in a hive. Frames with open brood and eggs should also be frozen and then placed in another hive.
    If you want the bees to consolidate the "gift" honey together with their own stocks, place an inner roof (with an opening for movement) below the super with the new frames. Scrape any capped honey cells to encourage the movement of the hone.
     
  18. lazy shooter

    lazy shooter New Member

    Messages:
    649
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Yo BSAChris:

    Thanks for the long and detailed explanation. Ef has added to your explanation, but between the two of you, I am getting a good picture in my head. Thanks again.