Book review

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by PerryBee, Jan 26, 2013.

  1. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    "The Beekeeper's Lament"
    Written by Hannah Norhaus

    Thought I would share my opinion about this book so far (almost done).
    Essentially it is a story about one of the larger (top 20) migratory keeps in the USA. Although I think I understand the basic concept of migratory keeping it is indeed more complex that I thought. It's history goes way back.

    Some things caught me off guard, the discovery that Varroa Jacobsoni (first identified by Edward Jacobson in 1904) is in fact different than the one identified by Denis Anderson (who incidentally passed on the right to name it Varroa Andersonii) and astutely called it Varroa Destructor.
    "For three decades, Anderson realized, entomologists had been studying the wrong mite".

    A bit of humour smattered about, including Justin Schmidt's "sting pain index", created in 1984
    IE: (partial index)
    1.0 Sweat Bee: Light, ephemeral, almost fruity. A tiny spark has singed a single hair on your arm.
    1.2 Fire Ant: Sharp, sudden, mildly alarming. Like walking across a shag carpet and reaching for the light switch.
    1.8 Bullhorn Acacia Ant: A rare piercing, elevated sort of pain. Someone has fired a staple into your cheek.
    2.0 Bald-Faced Hornet: Rich, hearty, slightly crunchy. Similar to getting your hand mashed in a revolving door.
    These of course go from low to high in scale and I haven't reached honey bees yet! :lol:

    An interesting passage on CCD, and the double edge sword it has become. Disaster, and yet brings bees to the worlds attention.
    "People put a lot on bees, and they take it on, as they take on all the other tasks they perform, because they don't have a lot of choice in how they live or what they do with their short lives or how they die. Honey bees are small creatures, but they must carry an enormous burden of preconception."

    Did you know that with the popularity of seedless oranges (Mandarin/Clemantine) and the subsequent expansion of this crop, there was an attempt in 2006 to legally prohibit honey bees from areas where this crop is grown? Turns out if honey bees visit these crops they produce seeds. There was an attempt to displace bee yards that had been established for decades. They have now developed hybrids that can circumvent the production of seeds but it is too late for established crops.
    "It is easier to interdict bees that replace trees.
    Unless of course, you are a beekeeper. Unless you need billions of flowers to feed billions of insects that you can't truly possess, that you can't control, that can't read NO TRESPASSING signs or understand the concepts of no-fly zones or hybridization or changing consumer preference. Unless you love something that can't love you back, that is just as happy to hurt you, that lives without concern for its keeper or his profit margins or his pride, and that dies with astonishing indiscretion - that simply does what it was born to do".

    I won't go any further, and hopefully I haven't spoiled it for any that chose to read it. I found it ..................illuminating! :thumbsup:

    (tec, I don't know if you have read this, but with the history detailed in this book I think you would find it interesting)
     
  2. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Thanks Perry. But, guys if you would hop on board with skype you could have gotten this review from the most friendly beard wielding Canadian bee keeper live! Myself, Tim and Perry had a little book review the other night...
     

  3. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Thanks Perry going to have to check it out and see if it is in the library. If not request it and they will buy it for there system. It always helps with the purchasing department if reviews are included so can I forward yours?
     
  4. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    No problem Keith my friend. :wink:
     
  5. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    Thanks, Perry. I bought it and will read it when it gets here. :)
     
  6. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Some final thoughts and quotes:
    Finished the book and will give it a good thumbs up. There are a few slow passages but on the whole I liked it.

    A few memorable quotes:

    It had taken him some time to accept that he must plan for disaster year after year: "I had been resistant to that because of pride, self-righteousness, denial, stupidity, not wanting to lose bees," he told me. But he'd finally faced the fact that he was going to see a lot more death than he liked.

    By now it should be obvious: bee guys are not reasonable people. They love bees. Bees grab them;say "take me." When their bees are sick, it affects them profoundly.

    Toast, any bread is merely a means to an end.
    The end is transporting as much honey as gravity and theory enables from jar to mouth; without actually putting a lip lock on that one-pound jar.
    It's just physics.
    If no one is looking, snorking from a honeybear is perfectly legal.
    (John Miller)