Boy of boy, I'm getting excited.

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Yankee11, Feb 5, 2013.

  1. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    Went down to bee yard today. (With jacket and smoker :smile:) To watch the hive activity. Man oh man were they busy.

    I pulled up a seat beside the entrances and just watched. They are clogging the entrances bringing in pollen.
    I am feeding pollen sub at the house but they have not been as busy as last couple of weeks at the pollen
    feeder. This may be why. They were bringing in, red, pink,tan and a lot of green pollen. My pollen sub is yellow.

    They were landing on top of the hives, on front of the hives and all over me. pollen sacks full. Like they were resting and waiting on a chance to get in the door.

    This has got to be a good sign.

    I think I need to get my deeps ready to set out.

    Temps for next 7 days. Highs mid 60's lows mid 40's.

    Gotta luv it.[​IMG]
     
  2. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Sounds good, just as long as the queen does not decide to start laying like crazy and another big cold snap comes along and freezes the bees out since they will not leave brood to cluster back up.
     

  3. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    i am envious yankee, and i would echo what g3 said.
    btw....
    "Went down to bee yard today. (With jacket and smoker :smile:)

    smoker????!!!!......:lol:
     
  4. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    yep I feel like a kid just before Xmas, flows on here and the girls are working there little stingers off, going into this season with 27 double deeps, 11 single deeps, and 5-5 frame nucs 3 of them ready for deeps, gonna be a fun season:thumbsup:
     
  5. jb63

    jb63 New Member

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    Zoo have you thought about making friends with a lumber mill?
     
  6. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    I hope not. We do usually get a cold snap or two in Feb. But what i was encouraged about was the fact that they are bringing in stuff other than what I have out. They have actually dropped off my Pollen sub.

    The queens have been laying for a bit already. I had capped brood in all hives about a week and a half ago. A 2 to 4 frames per hive. I'm sure they have hatched by now. I didn't open hives today.

    What kind of temperatures would I have to be worried about?
     
  7. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    You don't have to worry about any temp as long as you have enough bees for the cluster to cover the brood. It's when the cluster gets down to the size of the brood, they won't shrink it any farther. Then they can't produce the heat needed to keep them and it warm.
     
  8. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    I had to shovel a foot of snow off my roof today. So jealous. I guess I'll have to live vicariously through all you southerners for another couple of months.:)
     
  9. Lburou

    Lburou Member

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    Do you think that plastic frames could work against the cluster temperature in the cold? In other words, does plastic conduct cold into the comb? :)
     
  10. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    "Do you think that plastic frames could work against the cluster temperature in the cold? In other words, does plastic conduct cold into the comb?"

    no lee, it does not, and i have found no adverse reasons since switching and using plastic wax coated foundation, (i use pierco waxed foundation now) other than the bees are sometimes hesitant to draw it out.....but this is an easy fix. the bees do not heat up the entire hive or the frames they are on, it is the bees maintaining a temp in that cluster to stay warm.

    your question lee was to iddee's reply:
    "It's when the cluster gets down to the size of the brood, they won't shrink it any farther. Then they can't produce the heat needed to keep them and it warm."

    what iddee said, the bees will cover the brood, and i might add will die sometimes trying to cover the brood, if the cluster is not large enough to cover that brood to keep the brood or themselves warm. and sometimes this happens when queens get busy laying, and there is a cold snap, as g3 mentioned earlier, and as g3 said, the bees will not abandon brood.
     
  11. bamabww

    bamabww Active Member

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    Same here. We're having a very warm spell for this time of year with temps very similar to yours. Checked my hives yesterday the way you did and the bees were acting like it was mid May. I haven't opened mine since early November but plan to do so this week with the near 70 degrees temps forecast. Hoping for another early spring in Bama land.
     
  12. JUDELT

    JUDELT New Member

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    yes, we have a week of "above normal" weather ahead ,too. i opened my hives to just have a looksey and they have plenty of honey stores left. they have been acting like it's spring,too. i hope we don't have too bad of a cold snap; poor confused bees!
     
  13. Lburou

    Lburou Member

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    Me Too! Its 82F out there now. I looked in all my hives today. The pollen patties I put in there last week are gone in three out of four hives. They have been bringing pollen in for four days now. My 4 hives are about 80% of their late summer population! :eek:

    I'm shocked to see the stored pollen and honey reserves hardly touched from Fall. This is my first overwinter here in North central Texas, so its new to me. In Wyoming or Alaska (where I've overwintered in the past), the small amount of reserves left for the bees would surely be gone by now. I'm going to have to split early to beat the swarm impulse. But, it was a great afternoon here!

    P.S. I saw uncapped honey in all the hives today (not feeding).....I was shocked, but happy. :yahoo:
     
  14. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    What kind of temps are we talking about that could be harmful, 30's, 20's, teens?
     
  15. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    well actually Yankee the problem is up and down temperatures (not just cold). seasonal warm temperatures encourages brood rearing that the adult bees cannot cover when the temperature falls. this is not so abnormally associated with the consumption of honey near the brood nest so then when the adult population contracts to cover the brood it also has no feed to maintain either itself or the brood it so desperately want to protect.
     
  16. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    Well, about 10 days ago they had about 2-4 frames of capped brood in each hive. I am hoping that has hatched by now and given them that many more bees in the hive. They still had a lot of capped honey in each hive.

    Looks like the weather is going to cool a little next week. Lows in the mid 30's at night.