Boy, they almost fooled me. I think I'm getting it.

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Yankee11, Jun 10, 2013.

  1. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    Went down to do a couple inspections this afternoon. We had split a hive a while back and one hive had drawn some queen cells. I let them be for a while. Then checked about 1o days later and saw one of the queen cells had hatched. Left alone until today.

    So, I'm checking it out and see some capped brood, larva and eggs. Then go down a few more frames and see a capped swarm cell on the bottom of a frame.:dontknow: Keep going and see another capped swarm cell :dontknow: Plenty of room in drawn out frames. I was going to put back together and ask you guys what you thought. Then it hit me, The capped brood I saw looked like drone, then I decided to look at eggs a little closer. Sure enough, multiple eggs in cells. Laying worker bee.

    But, how could I have capped queen cells with a laying worker. I decided to open the QC's. They were both bad, dead larva in them. They just had not torn them down yet, I guess.

    So here is my plan,

    I have a nuc I started and the queen is doing great, Laying very well. I just moved them to a deep tonight. They are up buy my house/garden. I need to get them moved down to the bee yard. So, can't I move them down and sit them in the same place as this laying worker hive, Take the LW hive out a couple hundred feet in front of the bee yard and dump it on the ground. Won't all the bees fly into this nuke/deep I sit in its place. The laying worker gets left out in the grass and the nuc gets all the bees that fly back. Good idea or bad?

    As far as moving the new nuc/deep from my house/garden to bee yard. I started another nuc this past weeked and it's sitting right beside this nuc/deep I am moving. Wont all the foragers that are out come back to this new nuc and help strengthen it.

    The old switch-a-roo. Times 2.

    This time last year I had never heard of a laying worker.
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Sounds like a plan to me.
     

  3. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    Now new problem.

    I removed the frame with the eggs and capped drone larva on it from the laying worker hive. I wanted to practice with my grafting tool and magnifying glasses. I removed the caps on the larva and found a lot of mites. Some larva had 10 to 12 mites on one larva. There was only about 15 or so capped brood. I'm thinking there were so many in each capped brood because there was so few capped brood.

    Should I treat this colony before combining or will removing this only capped brood be enough. I am freezing the rame. I am not sure I want to dump all these bees on the ground and have them fly in other hives if they have a bad mite problem. Wouldn't that spread mites to all the hives they fly in to?

    Thanks
     
  4. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    I was told that with laying workers, one should shake the bees on a sheet on the ground about 10 feet in front of the hive. You know how it goes with opinions, but the theory is that that's enough to keep the laying workers from going back, but not so far that all the young bees that haven't oriented yet will get lost. As for the mites, all your hives have them, so I would not worry too much about the drifting. You can treat the combined colony too, as long as you don't think they'll need supers for a while.