Brand new. Need a little guidance

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by juntjoo, Jul 24, 2017.

  1. juntjoo

    juntjoo New Member

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    [​IMG] I'm getting into this just because I've been struggling with bees and bee keepers to remove them so I've decided just to keep them and take care of them instead.

    They are accessible within one of these decorative concrete columns between windows on the side/front of my house. One guy came out and made a hole, removed them but never finished, hence the mess, so they came back. I want to just move them into a hive box one of which I figure I'll grab for cheap somewhere and with your guidance hopefully transfer them into.

    So far I've gathered you shouldn't move them far at a time so I'll just move them directly into the box just a short distance away. I've got a jacket and can gather the other basic tools. They're not that aggressive and they just got here about a week ago. If you could just give me the basic steps I'll research from there unless this is pretty straight forward. Thanks

    [​IMG]
     
  2. juntjoo

    juntjoo New Member

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    Hmm... Maybe because I'm new the image hasn't shown up yet?
     

  3. ccjersey

    ccjersey Member

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    Youtube 628 dirtrooster channel. Lots of cutouts in his videos.

    If you don't want to destroy the masonry, you could do a trapout. Of course that still leaves the comb etc in the cavity, so its not ideal. Not sure that you will get the queen or may take a while, but the sooner you start the less brood and stores there will be.

    Trapout requires being able to seal all but one entrance to the cavity. Sounds like you may be able to do that. And finally, when you have all the bees out of the house, you must seal the cavity or screen the entrance etc or there will soon be another swarm of bees in there.
     
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  4. Bluzervic

    Bluzervic New Member

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    628dirtrooster and Mr. Ed, both do cut-out videos all the time. I learned from them on how to frame up my brood comb from a water meter cutout. Bees are a lot of fun, Enjoy and hope you are successful.
     
  5. juntjoo

    juntjoo New Member

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    Thanks. I watched a couple. I may need some time to figure out what I'll do
     
  6. juntjoo

    juntjoo New Member

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    Thanks. I'll look up the other guy. Truth is I wasn't looking for another hobby, I just don't have $400 to pay someone and I like the idea of the alternative but thinking about it more and more it looks like it will take some more time to figure out what I want to do.

    I'm envisioning keeping them in a box hanging from one the trees around my house above my head so I can mow the lawn underneath without too much worry. Does this idea sound like a good one? Idk, I'm thinking using rope or something. I'd just like to keep them as long as they don't get until my house and bother me too much. Occasionally one will chase me down and sting me. Don't know why lol. I don't even need to be within 20 ft and a couple times one of them decided to kamikazi me. And free natural honey sounds great too.
     
  7. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Active Member

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    dont hang your bee hive, it is not feasible, also that hive can weigh upwards of 100lbs when filled with honey...make a ground hive on a stand and put some stone around the base so you dont have to mow so close to the hive..
     
  8. juntjoo

    juntjoo New Member

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    thanks
     
  9. juntjoo

    juntjoo New Member

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    How about putting the hive on wheels?

    Also, as far as getting the hive from where it is inside one of these columns to a new hive box, is it pretty straight forward? Anything I need to know? Any guides on this step or just simply grab the existing hive and stick it in the box? I see the boxes you use consist of trays for the bees to make their hive in. Would I just drop the existing hive in and they'd reconstruct it on those trays on their own? Are they going to try to kill me while I'm doing this? Will i need more than a jacket with hood and gloves? I got a cheap standard set that served me well enough so far but I wasn't digging into their hive. Thanks
     
  10. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Active Member

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    do you have a smoker?..take the comb out of the column and rubber band it onto those wooden frames( trays) in the box, once the brood hatches out of it you can try to remove them and let the bees build new wax comb on the frames..other than that protect yourself the best you can and any way you can get the hive out of the column and into a box is a success...
     
  11. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Active Member

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    I dont see the edit button anymore, forgot to answer about wheels...you have to worry about tipping the hive over, if you build a cart wide enough to be stable and to hold the weight, that should be fine to move them around, but you dont want to move them much as any bees out of the hive will go back to the original location and if the hive is gone they will die off...
     
  12. juntjoo

    juntjoo New Member

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    Thanks! Cool. Doesn't sound too difficult. And I'll be ordering a smoker with a box and I'll probably put together a cart with larger wheels. Yes, I read no more than 3 ft at a time.
     
  13. juntjoo

    juntjoo New Member

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    What am I doing? What do I Google to get some basic steps? Sorry. Idk what a brood or cutout or trap out is. I have seen that there is something about finding the queen I might need to worry about. And all the videos I've seen are about moving bees from one box to another and catching swarms. I saw something about spraying sugar water on them. But I didn't find anything on moving them from their homemade home into a box. Do I need to do something with the queen? Is there more to this than just grabbing the comb and putting it in the box? Will they figure out on their own what to do with it?
     
  14. juntjoo

    juntjoo New Member

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    And what do I put the bees in? I just read that one of these $70 boxes is called a honey super and that it is only an addition to a "hive body". Could I just start with a super? Isn't it what a hive body is made out of, then I could throw on a lid? Trying to save money ATM.
     
  15. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Active Member

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    ok..sloooow down..its not rocket science, all though sometimes you do everything right and all goes wrong....get a 10 frame box deep( super) with 10 frames, you can get that cheaper than $70.00 from any of the larger bee suppliers and they offer free shipping over $99.00,it also depends how big the hive you are moving..as you remove the comb from the column you take the center plastic out of the frames and rubber band the pieces of comb onto the frames, as you remove the comb you can look for the queen, if your lucky to find her hold her off to the side in a separate container till you have the new box all loaded with the comb, and any bees you collect ( you can knock them off the comb into a card board box with just a cover, this is temporary) once you have all the comb you can get out of the column and into the box, just dump the box of bees into the new hive and put the queen in if you found her and put the cover on..if you cant find the queen there will be a good chance they will requeen, I would feed them sugar water right away to give them a food boost after ripping their home apart till they get settled in...brood that is on the comb will hatch out in 5 days, so if you let them sit for a week or so undisturbed and then check for new brood, if there is, then the queen made it to the new hive if not then you can buy a queen to put in or wait to see if they requeen on their own( around 3 weeks give or take till she starts laying new brood)...
     
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  16. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Active Member

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  17. juntjoo

    juntjoo New Member

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  18. Bluzervic

    Bluzervic New Member

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    I am not too sure about putting bees on a cart with wheels. They are sensitive to vibration and they may get irritated when you move them.
    Try to learn the difference between capped brood, and capped honey and drone comb. It will help you decide what to rubberband up in the empty frames. Try to keep as much brood comb as possible.
    Also, just be as gentle as possible.
     
  19. juntjoo

    juntjoo New Member

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    Thanks. I'll definitely study up on this first even if it turns out to be easy I do tend to make a lot of mistakes on new things.
     
  20. juntjoo

    juntjoo New Member

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    question: if I lose the queen somehow will they maintain the comb/broods I transfer?

    And assuming she stays intact with the comb will it allow me move the hive further distances at a time with less risk of them losing the ... whatever you call it(comb?)?