Broken up swarm

Discussion in 'Swarms, Cut outs, and Trap outs' started by cstephen, May 5, 2011.

  1. cstephen

    cstephen New Member

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    I always get the hard ones. That seems to be my mantra. Got a swarm call at 7:30 AM today. On the local university campus. It seems they had swarmed on the back bumper of a Toyota pick-up in a dorm parking lot yesterday evening by accounts. The owner discovered it later in the night when he and his buds wanted to go out partying. They tried throwing sticks at it to dislodge it to no avail. They then decided to brave the situation by driving off to try and shake the bees. I wasn’t there so I don’t know the exact circumstance, but they apparently got stung and abandoned the truck a few hundred yards away and called the cops. The cops did nothing except inform university officials about the situation and tell the kid to leave the truck. They were too unnerved to even get out of their vehicles and cordon off the site.

    The grounds crew who responded in the morning said the bees on the truck appeared to be lethargic and dying and so they took several shovel fulls of them who were on the pavement to a nearby tree. Then they called me. They thought maybe the kids had sprayed the bees with insecticide since they were acting so slow but there were still a few on the tree and more on the trunk of a car by the spot where the truck was parked before it was moved.

    When I arrived there were a couple thousand bees bearded on the tailgate of the truck. The car in question a few hundred yards away had maybe 500 trying to get in the trunk. The tree had maybe had 100 milling about. My inspection showed no sign of insecticide spray.

    We vacuumed the bees off the truck and thought they might be invading the bed lining and suspected that it was the location of he queen. Not. The bees from the car seemed to be migrating to the truck as there were only about 50 or so bearded when I returned to vac them. We took them anyway and left an equal amount in the air.

    We then went back to the truck and vacuumed another 100 leaving about as many in the air as well.

    We never did see a queen or the usual signs of a protective ball. So I got a few thousand bees in a vac box and brought them home to a new TB box. No sign of a queen. I’ve no idea what happened. Maybe she absconded with the shoveled bunch by the tree to another location.

    Since I have no active hives and am still dealing with a trap out, I need to get them a queen if they are to survive. Can a swarm caught in May make it with 3,000 or less bees with a new queen? Should I bother to save them in a nuc or just pass them on to another beek in need of bees?

    Claude
     
  2. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Good for you for not walking away. A lot of work for what may have little results but at least you have given them a chance. Nuc and a queen? Why not?
    Or even just a frame with brood and eggs if you can spare one.
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Add them to the trap out.
     
  4. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Way to hang tough and take care of the situation :thumbsup:
     
  5. cstephen

    cstephen New Member

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  6. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Nice story!
    Newspapers tend to do that, "infestations" :roll: . Sometimes you just wanna............................. :box:
     
  7. cstephen

    cstephen New Member

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    And still we persist PerryBee. We're fond of the little girls and the honey they provide us and all the good they do in the world. Touching stories you've told on your blog.

    I've gotten very good at catching bees. I need to learn a lot more about keeping them.

    Claude